Save Your Season: Kettering learning from the stars

first_img Master and pupil: Leicester prop Marcos Ayerza scrums down with Kettering hooker Steve Fraher at Oval Park. Ayerza took part in the session alongside Tigers team-mates Matt Cornwell and George ChuterBy Alan PeareyFIVE LEAGUE games to go and there are signs that the performance makeover being applied to Kettering RFC is taking effect. An heroic 19-14 win over high-flying Peterborough Lions brought relief for our Save Your Season winners, who are lying in tenth place in Midlands One East.The victory follows a skills session at Leicester Tigers that will be long remembered by the amateur Blues players. Test forwards George Chuter and Marcos Ayerza were on hand to give advice on scrummaging and throwing, ex-England Saxons lock Richard Blaze took charge of the lineout and breakdown, and Tigers utility back Mark Cornwell passed on some kicking tips to the boys with the tee.Overseeing the session was ex-Ireland fly-half Paul Burke, who was impressed by the visitors. “Your attitude was excellent,” he told them. “At Leicester we spend a shed-load of time working on core skills because if they’re not up to scratch you won’t improve. Catch and pass, breakdown, presenting the ball – do these things well and you’ll enjoy your rugby and start winning. Hopefully you’ll take something out of this session that will save your season.”A full report on Kettering’s trip to Oval Park, plus some guidance on protein needs for rugby from the Gatorade Sports Science Institute, features in the April issue of Rugby World.Hot on its heels is an equally instructive session with the performance department at Northampton, whose advanced practices leave most other clubs standing. TAGS: Leicester TigersNorthampton Saints LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Blues players were put to the test in the gym during an exacting afternoon with four Saints stars and performance director Nick Johnston. It culminated in a ten-activity muscular endurance circuit that will make you wince!Find out more about that, and why Samu Manoa had everyone cracking up when using the leg-drive machine, in the May issue of Rugby World.For training videos and expert advice that can help you develop your own game, see saveyourseason.co.uklast_img read more

Summer Test: Australia 28-39 England

first_img In a pulsating encounter in Brisbane, Australia outscored England four tries to three but 24-points from Owen Farrell in a brilliant kicking display saw England come away with a vital first win in the three-Test Series. After being 29-13 down, the Wallabies fought back to 32-28 with minutes to go before a breakaway try, converted by Jack Nowell, saw England breathe and their vocal supporters celebrate. It’s now seven from seven under Eddie Jones.What’s hotWallabies quick out of the blocksAfter 20 minutes England were looking as if they were still in departures in Heathrow. Michael Hooper had popped over the whitewash wide on the right, and Israel Folau had glided through the England defence adroitly after Bernard Foley has timed his pass to perfection. If Foley’s brilliant individual score hadn’t been chalked off, it would have been even worse. Much credit must go to Michael Cheika who is a master tactician, who squeezed England’s lack of width in the wide channels. It’s a shame for the Wallabies they couldn’t maintain their firecracker start.Try-time: The Wallabies started brilliantly with Israel Folau benefittingMaro Itoje’s maturity is frighteningSometimes you need reminding Maro Itoje is playing only his sixth Test for England. Nearly every intervention in the first half was a positive one, from stealing lineout ball, to contesting at the breakdown, and making hard yards in the tight. He was simply immense in every respect, performing in a way that is beyond his tender years. In a rare event he was not named man of the match, but no one would have blinked had he been given a gong.Owen Farrell is now in the world-class kicking bracketIn the same vein as Leigh Halfpenny for Wales, Owen Farrell’s accuracy off the tee is such that opposing teams can’t afford to give him chances within range. Eight out of nine successful kicks, or an 80 per cent plus kicking conversion success is becoming the norm. Calls for him to be the Lions No 10 are growing credence by the Test. As Sir Ian McGeechan famously says, Farrell is a ‘Test Match Animal’.World-class: Owen Farrell had a brilliant day from the bootComeback kidGeorge Ford had a day to forget in Twickenham, with a torrid day kicking, but when thrust into the action, tactically by Eddie Jones, after less than half-an-hour with Luther Burrell leaving the field, he took his chance to seek redemption. With Owen Farrell taking over the kicking duties, Ford was able to play his instinctive game. A long, looping pass for Yarde showcased his technical ability, and he clinched the game showcasing his vision, with a cute kick behind the defence for Nowell to score.  Form blip aside, Ford is far too classy to discard, something the ever-shrewd Eddie Jones is well aware of.What’s notWallabies still lack power in the tight fiveDespite Mario Ledesma’s inspired intervention during the World Cup, which turned the Wallabies into a respected scrummaging unit, they were unable to dominate the England pack in the way they’d have wanted to, Scott Sio’s sin-binning a case in point. The famed ‘Pooper’ combination of Pocock and Hooper were unable to exert their usual influence at the breakdown and as a result England won. Simple. How Australia counter that could decide the Series.Creaking: The Wallaby pack was put under severe pressure from England’s eightMuted crowd at the SuncorpMaybe because it was the First Test and the Series was not riding on it, but it was a quiet crowd in Brisbane just when the Wallabies needed them to make their patch hostile for the visitors. The PA announcer had to whip up the crowd to try to get them going late on but much credit must go to England for silencing them. Expect things to be very different in Melbourne in a week’s time.England lose shape at the wrong timeWith England in control at 29-13 and Scott Sio yellow-carded, they should have been looking to close out the game, but a second Michael Hooper score, and Tevita Kurdrani burst made it far too nervy for England in the final quarter. Making so many tactical substitutions saw England lose their shape and make it extremely uncomfortable few minutes until Jack Nowell sealed the win.Comeback: England made it difficult for themselves losing shape in the last 20 minutesStatsAustralia outran England with 403 metres carried to England’s 296 metresAustralia beat 20 defenders to England’s eightAustralia made 88 tackles to England’s 114The game’s top ball carrier was Israel Folau with 95 metres, second was Mike Brown with 85 and third Dane Haylett-Petty with 65The game’s top tackler was James Haskell with 18Australia TAGS: Highlight The clincher: Jack Nowell picks up a Ford kick to win the game for England LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img England started sluggishly but their forward power and the nerveless kicking of Owen Farrell saw them home despite a spirited comeback Israel Folau; Dane Haylett-Petty, Tevita Kuridrani, Samu Kerevi, Rob Horne; Bernard Foley, Nick Phipps; Scott Sio, Stephen Moore (captain), Greg Holmes, Rory Arnold, Rob Simmons, Scott Fardy, Michael Hooper, David Pocock.Replacements: Tatafu Polota-Nau, James Slipper, Sekope Kepu, James Horwill, Dean Mumm, Sean McMahon, Nick Frisby, Christian LealiifanoScorersTries: Hooper (2), Folau, KuridraniPenalties: Bernard Foley (2)Cons: Foley (1)Momentum: England are starting to build their confidence on the world stage againEngland: 15. Mike Brown; 14. Anthony Watson, 13. Jonathan Joseph, 12. Luther Burrell, 11. Marland Yarde; 10. Owen Farrell, 9. Ben Youngs; 1. Mako Vunipola, 2. Dylan Hartley, 3. Dan Cole, 4. Maro Itoje, 5. George Kruis, 6. Chris Robshaw, 7. James Haskell, 8. Billy Vunipola.Replacements: 16. Luke Cowan-Dickie, 17. Matt Mullan, 18. Paul Hill, 19. Joe Launchbury, 20. Courtney Lawes, 21. Danny Care, 22. George Ford, 23. Jack Nowell.Scorers: Tries: Jonathan Joseph, Marland Yarde, Jack NowellPens: Owen Farrell (6)Cons: Farrell (3)Referee: Romain PoiteMan of the match: James Haskelllast_img read more

Gallagher Premiership targets August return

first_imgFixtures have been announced for the resumption of the English top flight, including midweek matches. Here’s the latest information on the Premiership’s imminent return Gallagher Premiership targets August returnThe Gallagher Premiership will restart with Harlequins hosting Sale Sharks at the Twickenham Stoop on Friday 14 August.The next day there will be four matches – Exeter v Leicester, Bath v London Irish, Worcester v Gloucester and Bristol v Saracens. And on Sunday 16 August Wasps will visit Northampton.The following six rounds of the tournament have also been confirmed. Precise details for the penultimate round, to be played on the weekend of 18-20 September, are to be clarified. Round 22 completes the regular programme on Sunday 4 October before the semi-finals the following weekend. The Premiership final takes place on Saturday 24 October.The English top flight was suspended in March with nine rounds still to play, as well as the semi-finals and final, due to the pandemic. League organisers have had to schedule midweek matches in order to complete the season in that time frame.BT Sport will show every game played behind close doors live on TV. Once fans are allowed to return to stadia, the broadcaster will revert to selecting matches for live transmission.If you don’t have a subscription to BT Sport but want to watch Gallagher Premiership matches, you can get a contract-free monthly pass here.Related: Gallagher Premiership fixturesRugby’s return: Harlequins v Sale will be the first match when the Premiership resumes (Getty Images)Sale director of rugby Steve Diamond said: “It’s fantastic that we have the opportunity to return to play after such a long lay-off. I think everyone across the league is chomping at the bit to get going again. It’s been a turbulent period for everyone, but as a club we feel we have come out of the other end of this period stronger than ever.“We have a top bunch of players here and all the lads have put their hands up and worked hard for the club during our return-to-play preparations. We are ready and raring to go so it will be a great occasion at the Stoop on Friday 14 August.”Players will have had around eight weeks to prepare for the restart of the season, having begun Stage One of training in June and Stage Two last month. There has been some disruption due to Covid, with players testing positive for the virus having to self-isolate.However, the latest round of testing produced only two positive tests – one player and one staff member – out of 917 tests conducted.Contact work: Exeter do some scrum training ahead of the resumption of Premiership fixtures (Getty)The results of Premiership Rugby’s coronavirus testing so far are:Week One (6 July) – 804 players and club staff tested. Ten positive tests – six players and four non-playing staff. Summer rugby: The Gallagher Premiership is hoping to restart in mid-August (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? Download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Week Two (13 July) – 856 players and club staff tested. Nine positive tests – seven players and two non-playing staff.Week Three (20 July) – 896 players and club staff tested. Two positive tests – both players.Week Four (27 July) – 846 players and club staff tested. Five positive tests – four players and one non-playing staff member.Week Five (3 August) – 917 players and club staff tested. Two positive tests – one player and one non-playing staff member.Stage One allowed for individual conditioning (or groups of individuals conditioning) in a performance environment with strict social distancing. Stages Two and Three mean players can train in closer proximity and contact training can be introduced.Related: The challenges of rugby’s return to training explained Premiership Rugby chief executive Darren Childs said: “We are delighted to be on track to bring rugby back to fans and see our players out in competition. We are now cautiously optimistic for a safe return to the season.”Exeter Chiefs are top of the Premiership table with nine wins after 13 rounds. Sale, Bristol and Northampton are the other teams currently in the play-off spots.The Guinness Pro14 is also aiming to return in August but is focusing on local derbies before the semi-finals and final in a truncated season. Meanwhile, EPCR has scheduled the knockout stages of the European Champions and Challenge Cups for September and October.last_img read more

The Effect Of Cumulative Rugby Injuries On Retired Players

first_img TAGS: Investigation “Medical cover needs to see them through their ageing. It needs to be seen as lifelong cover,” she insists. As matters stand, rugby union players are only medically covered for the nine months after the end of their contract. After that, save for any RPA assistance, they’re on their own.The RPA are reviewing their services in the wake of Covid-19, and Bryan says that this is slated to be part of discussions. “Part of our review is how should the wider game, not just Restart, put a more systematic plan in place for how players can cope with the effects of their playing career.”The UK Rugby Health Project does suggest one innovative idea which may help with this systematicity – monitoring injuries at player level rather than club level.Dr Hind says: “When a player signs a new contract, a medical record of their injuries will not usually follow them into another club. An individual player’s injury history could instead be followed as they move across professional contracts, and specific strength, conditioning and therapy prescribed to prevent recurrence of injury.” But, as she acknowledges, there may be a problem.“This information could help look after that player, but they might not want to disclose that for fear of not getting a contract. There needs to be more transparency, more care, more understanding of the situation from a player’s point of view.”It’s not the only place where players, clubs and governing bodies come into conflict. One of the interesting aspects of the UK Rugby Health Project is that it is independently funded, something relatively rare amongst rugby studies. After all, who’s going to fund research into rugby if not rugby?Watching over: World Rugby govern the sport (Getty Images)This means studies are often reliant on the investment of governing bodies, whose funds allow a far greater amount of research to take place than would otherwise be possible. But how much control do these organisations have over any research findings?Buried in a publicly accessible World Rugby contract are two short clauses which grant the organisation full power to selectively publish potentially seismic results. Clause 5.5 – ‘All Results and Results IPR shall be owned by the Company from the date of their creation’, and 5.7 – ‘The Applicant shall only be entitled to publish and/or disclose to a third party the whole and/or any part of the Results with the prior written approval of the Company’.According to a 2016 investigation by the NZ Herald, these clauses have already been at the centre of a research dispute between World Rugby, New Zealand Rugby and scientists from the Auckland University of Technology (AUT).The Herald investigation claims that “World Rugby and the NZRU did not give approval for the full report and all the results to be released”, meaning potentially important conclusions may have been omitted from the final presentation.Read next: IS IT TIME TO RETHINK STRENGTH & CONDITIONING IN RUGBY?For example, one of the key passages, whose release World Rugby and NZRU reportedly would not sanction, was obtained by the Weekend Herald under the Official Information Act. It reads: “To better address the implications for player neurocognitive health, we believe players should be aware of the potential increased long-term risk of cognitive impairment from concussion, so they can make informed choices about engagement in sport and return to play following injury.”The NZRU and World Rugby deny the New Zealand Herald report, but the former’s most senior scientist, Dr Ken Quarrie, has spoken publicly about the conflict of interest between scientific research and governing bodies.Guided by science: Dr Ken Quarrie (Getty Images)“I have grappled with the inherent conflict that is associated with such research, but not doing it is not an option,” says Dr Quarrie. “I personally do not believe that a national sporting organisation (NSO) can claim to be a truly independent arbiter of such research, and in my time with the NZRU we never sought to do so.”The future? Rugby seems to have hit a stumbling block. Scientific research is desperately needed in a sport played by 2.5 million in the UK and Ireland alone. The startling results of the UK Rugby Health Project suggest that research into the repercussions of a professional career has barely scratched the surface.These Durham University researchers still have a lot more data and information to publish – their paper on cumulative injuries is the first of at least eight, with future work due on the relationship between injuries and mental health, cognitivity and brain markers respectively.These could begin to provide biological explanations for the symptoms of post-concussion syndrome or give us more clues into a possible link between head trauma and motor neurone disease. Dr Hind is also co-leading the Global Rugby Health Research network alongside colleagues from AUT. It all shows that we’re only just seeing the effects of a professional career on retired athletes.Study ahead: More to learn from studying injuries (Getty Images)The dilemma is this. Does rugby pursue truly independent research but accept that a lack of funding may lead to slower progress? Or do governing bodies plough money into their own studies yet be unable to be a ‘truly independent arbiter’ of this research? Neither option is especially appealing.One answer could be for governing bodies to consider removing the clauses in their academic contracts which give them sole control over the release of research. Governing bodies are worried about the potential impact such research could have on participation numbers – but is the cat already out of the bag? A 2017 study has shown that only 45% of former elite rugby players would recommend a career in the professional game to family and friends – a depressingly high number.It’s a number which shows players are bearing chronic pain in their hips, their knees, their backs and their heads. It’s been a problem since the birth of professionalism. And if the risks aren’t known, the game won’t change. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Jacob Whitehead analyses a recent Durham University study into rugby injuries “Living in the bubble of professional sport is a privilege and one day it is going to burst. I bump into retired team-mates all the time and their message is unanimous. The real world is not nearly as much fun.” – Dylan HartleyThe fact that rugby is a brutal and attritional sport is uncontroversial, but as Dylan Hartley’s book The Hurt demonstrates, rugby is only just beginning to understand that the pain does not stop the moment a player retires.A new study by Durham University scientists has become the first investigation to analyse the cumulative injury-load of an elite player – and then measure the sustained impact on the athlete’s life after they retire. Commencing in 2016 as an independently-funded development of the New Zealand Rugby Health project, 189 former elite rugby players (145 from union, 44 from league) took part alongside control groups.The researchers were testing for trauma, taking a detailed account of each participant’s injury history, prodding every inch as they took blood, ran bone density scans, studied brain response, put them through ECGs and even balance tests. Ex-Premiership stalwart Tom May referred to the test as an ‘MOT’ on his Twitter account.Dr Karen Hind leads the project and has specifically worked on musculoskeletal health and rugby for more than a decade, including groundbreaking research into the hidden toll on players’ spines. Speaking to Rugby World, Dr Hind explained how some of her most recent findings surprised her.Read next: CHRONIC PAIN, CANNABIS AND RUGBY“When the numbers came in it was eye-opening how many injuries players were sustaining. If they’re suffering multiple traumatic injuries during their playing career, what does that mean once they retire? It’s only natural that repetitive trauma is going to cause problems in later life, it doesn’t just go away. We’ve known this, it just needed to be quantified with evidence. That’s what our study is looking to provide – the numbers.”High profile: Former England’s captain Dylan Hartley (Getty Images)These numbers themselves are startling. A player averages 1.6 injuries per season over a playing career of 24.3 years. Add those numbers up and that’s nearly 40 injuries before retirement. The stark statistics lead to an important question – how vulnerable are players once their rugby stops?“The players were really responsive to the project,” Dr Hind explains. “A frequent comment from former rugby players was that while they are signed to a contract, the medical care and support is there, but when they retire they don’t have any specific medical support and are left to sort it out. This can be daunting and expensive, or mean long waiting times on the NHS.”The UK Rugby Health Project aims to supply the objective figures to the testimony of players like James Haskell, who spoke candidly about the issue on his podcast The Good, the Bad and the Rugby.“I hadn’t got medical insurance because all the way through our careers we were looked after. I had no aid to get an MRI scan on three parts of my body. I need treatment on three bulging discs, I need an injection in my ankle, I need shoulder surgery. And no one’s going to pay for that apart from me. And obviously you don’t get insurance pay-outs because it’s all classed as wear and tear. And we are not unique.”Judging by the findings of Dr Hind’s team, Haskell is certainly correct when he claims not to be alone. Retired players are up to nine times more likely to suffer the continued effect of injuries than control subjects who have never played a contact sport. Osteoarthritis is more than twice as likely in ex-professional players than the general population (51% v 22%). 68% of players have suffered a knee ligament injury, and 27% are still affected by that knee – compared to corresponding figures of 20% and 7% amongst non-contact sport athletes.Reading the report is to be reminded that the injuries of a career are chronic, and the battle with chronic pain never stops.Work in the women’s game is also taking place. “We’re also studying female rugby players but haven’t got enough numbers there yet,” says Dr Hind. “From what we’ve seen in the data coming back from retired females, we’re looking at exactly the same situation.”Crossover: Initial data suggests women’s game will see similar (Getty Images)So what’s being done about this?For those involved in the UK Rugby Health Project, these figures demand action, and the report makes several recommendations focused around player welfare.Dr Hind adds: “Players are not commodities but human beings who’ve got families and lives ahead of them. They need to be looked after post-career and I don’t think that’s happening at the moment. The governing bodies have a duty of care to these professional players, who, at the end of the day, are their employees.”One group trying to look after players post-retirement is the Rugby Players’ Association (RPA), whose Rugby Director is the ex-Bath, Bridgend and Leeds player Richard Bryan. He welcomes this new study and insists that changes are being made.“As with all this research, it helps inform us about the questions that we need to ask our retired members, to formulate where we need to focus our attention. There’s a quite significant amount of work taking place by all stakeholders around the game,” he says. “At the forefront of that is the work that’s going on around English rugby, around the Professional Rugby Injury Surveillance Project (PRISP), alongside the RFU and Premiership Rugby.”Read next: THE PROBLEMS WITH CBD OIL EXPLAINEDSo what about for players who have already retired?“In terms of physical health specifically, there’s our charity Restart,” Bryan explains. “Traditionally Restart has helped players where they’re unable to potentially pay themselves to help fund treatment for rugby-related injuries.”“Another service we put in place is a formal treatment pathway for retired RPA members who report suffering from the long-term effects of concussion. Via this pathway players have accessed a neurophysical assessment, which can lead to a referral to a neurologist at the Institute of Sport, Exercise and Health. They can also access support from our confidential counselling service, run by Cognacity, where a third of callers are retired players.”Rep the logo: Players in Restart Rugby T-shirts (Getty Images)The Durham University study revealed that 81% of players have sustained a concussion at some point in their career. But for Dr Hind, post-retirement care must go further. End of an era: Kicking off the boots (Getty Images) last_img read more

Law variations for new Premier 15s season

first_imgHere are the Premier 15s law variations: The English women’s top flight returns this weekend – but it will look different Champions: Saracens have won the previous two Premier 15s finals in 2018 and 2019 (Getty Images) Law variations for new Premier 15s seasonThe Premier 15s returns this weekend with one new sponsor, two new teams and several law variations.Allianz has replaced Tyrrells as the title partner of the English women’s top flight while Exeter Chiefs and Sale Sharks join the ten-team league in place of Richmond and Waterloo having succeeded in the tender process earlier this year.Related: Allianz Premier 15s team-by-team guideThe biggest change, however, is to the laws matches will be played under. Unlike the Gallagher Premiership or Guinness Pro14, there is no Covid-19 testing programme in place for the Allianz Premier 15s, so a number of laws have been adapted to minimise face-to-face contact during matches and thus lower the risk of transmission.These include reducing the number of scrums and mauls, as well as the length of mauls. For example, a maul can only stop once before the ball has to be used and teams can only drive a lineout inside the 22s.Matches will also be 70 minutes rather than 80 due to the increased ball-in-play time with the changes. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A play advantage law from a knock-on – reducing scrums by over 75%Free-kicks awarded to the opposition for a forward pass – reducing face-to-face contact by 6%Removal of the option for a scrum at a free-kick or penalty – reducing face-to-face contact by 7%A maul may only have one stop then the ball must be used to reduce the length of the maulNo players who are not in the start of a lineout can join a maul to reduce the number of players in the maulIt will only be possible to drive a lineout in 22m to reduce the number of maulsStrict social distancing while ball is out of play, including set water breaks, named bottles, limited face-to-face warm-upGame time is reduced to 35 minutes each way to mitigate risk while also recognising the game will be faster with fewer stoppages and thereby supporting player welfareThese variations will be in place for at least the first nine rounds. They will then be reviewed at the season’s midpoint to determine whether to continue with the adapted measures or return to standard laws.On top of the law changes, there are also strict medical and operating practices that Premier 15s teams must follow, including temperature checking and enhanced cleaning regimes, as part of the Government’s Elite Sport Return to Play Guidance.The season will consist of 18 home-and-away rounds from Saturday 10 October, followed by semi-finals and then the final on 8 May 2021.One match from each of the first four rounds will be live streamed on Premier15s.com, Premier 15s Twitter as well as England Rugby’s YouTube and Facebook channels. They are:Gloucester-Hartpury v Exeter Chiefs (Sat 10 Oct, 2.30pm)Wasps v Harlequins (Sat 17 Oct, 2pm)Worcester Warriors v Wasps (Sat 24 Oct, 2pm)Loughborough Lightning v Harlequins (Sat 7 Nov, 2pm) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

El equipo de trabajo para reformar la estructura de la…

first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA [Episcopal News Service] El 14 de febrero, la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori y la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, compartieron con el Equipo de Trabajo sobre la Estructura de la Iglesia su propia impresión de la tarea que enfrenta el grupo de 26 miembros.Sus comentarios se produjeron el primer día de la reunión inicial del equipo de trabajo que tiene lugar del 14 al 16 de febrero en el Instituto Marítimo de Linthicum Heights, Maryland.“La tarea de ustedes es aportar toda su creatividad, capacidad de estrategia, pensamiento y oración a la tarea de sugerir cómo podríamos sostener y afianzar y hacerle frente a la vida y obra de esta Iglesia de una mejor manera, y hacerlo, como alguien dice, con ‘sencilla y santa intrepidez’”, dijo Jefferts Schori.La obispa primada expresó que los miembros de la Iglesia están al presente concentrando su atención en cuatro áreas. La primera son los problemas en torno a la identidad, afirmó, tales como “quiénes somos, qué nos proponemos”. La segunda es la misión, la cual según ella es “una respuesta fundamental a la interrogante sobre la identidad”. La sostenibilidad en la misión es la tercera área e incluye la cuestión de cómo todas las partes de la Iglesia pueden desarrollarse para alcanzar el autosostén. El último foco de la atención es la organización y la estructuración para la misión.Jefferts Schori indicó que se espera que el equipo le informe a la Iglesia a fines de 2014, “con la esperanza de que nuestra próxima Convención General aceptará sus propuestas”.“No obstante, el cambio y la reforma no estarán esperando hasta entonces”, afirmó, añadiendo que el equipo encargado de la configuración de la próxima Convención General “ya ha comenzado a ver cómo podría funcionar de manera más efectiva”.Además de las cuatro áreas de atención bosquejadas por la obispa primada, ella también planteó interrogantes, entre muchas otras, acerca de cómo la estructura de la Iglesia debía responder  a una  “visión flexible y variada de las congregaciones y comunidades de fe” y cómo tales comunidades podrían evolucionar a partir de los diversos empeños de la misión.“Vamos a necesitar repensar, reestructurar y reformar a fin de asegurar que todos estos  desarrollen lo que sea sostenible —como congregaciones y diócesis, y para que el clero y el liderazgo laico pueda ser sostenible”, dijo.Jefferts Schori también alentó al grupo a considerar el modo en que la Iglesia Episcopal puede formar y desarrollar sus relaciones de plena comunión con otras denominaciones y sus relaciones a través de la Comunión Anglicana.El texto completo de los comentarios de la obispa primada debe aparecer próximamente aquí.Jennings resaltó que la Convención General dijo en julio de 2012, cuando pidió la formación del equipo, que “cree que el Espíritu Santo insta a la Iglesia Episcopal a  reinventarse, de manera que, nos afirmemos en nuestra rica herencia y no obstante estemos abiertos a nuestro futuro creativo”.Sin embargo, apuntó, “no tenemos ningún consenso en lo que queremos decir cuando afirmamos que pretendemos ‘reinventar a la Iglesia Episcopal’”, así como presentar en la próxima reunión de la Convención un plan para reformar las estructuras, el gobierno y la administración de la Iglesia.“Les toca a ustedes definir el alcance de lo que se proponen reestructurar”, le dijo ella al equipo, añadiendo que podía afectar la estructura corporativa de la Iglesia; la estructura de diócesis y provincias, el Consejo Ejecutivo, los comités, comisiones, agencias y juntas de la Iglesia, la educación teológica y la Convención General misma.Jennings afirmó que la tarea de los miembros del equipo de trabajo es la de ser “guías” y “no agentes de nadie; ni subalternos de nadie” al tiempo que iniciaban su tarea, empezando a “ponerle fin a la Iglesia institucional tal como la hemos conocido”.No existe aún un vocabulario común para describir resultados o enfoques. “Sobre todo, tenemos muchos supuestos sin cuestionar y no muchos datos”.La presidente de la Cámara de Diputados agregó que lo que ella le oye decir a muchos clérigos y laicos es que “tienen notablemente poca necesidad o interés en las tradicionales estructuras verticales de gobierno más afines al mundo de Mad Men que al de Modern Family”“Cualquier nueva estructura que valga la pena tendrá que aprovechar el compromiso de ustedes con el Evangelio, su pasión por la misión y su energía y creatividad”, recalcó.“Aguardaré con gran interés mientras ustedes nos llevan a realidades cambiantes, gratas y cautivadoras, a redes emergentes, a jerarquías derribadas, a medios de comunicación que cambian con celeridad, a nuevas y asombrosas tecnologías y a nuevas ideas sobre lo que significa una comunidad”,  enfatizó. “Todos estamos orando por ustedes.”El texto completo de las palabras de Jennings aparece aquí.Las dos hicieron sus comentarios durante una sesión abierta que también ha de incluir una revisión de la encomienda del equipo.El resto de las sesiones del 14 de febrero, los eventos de los próximos dos días así como las discusiones en pequeños grupos se mantendrán en privado. El oficio de clausura el 16 de febrero estará abierto al público.El equipo de trabajo se propone publicar una declaración luego de que concluya la reunión, según una notificación a los medios de prensa que puede verse aquí.El equipo de trabajo se creó mediante la Resolución C095, aprobada en la reunión de julio pasado de la Convención General.La Resolución C095 requería un equipo de trabajo de 24 miembros encargado de presentar un plan a la próxima Convención General en 2015 “para reformar las estructuras, el gobierno y la administración de la Iglesia”. Según la resolución, “los miembros del equipo de trabajo reflejarán la diversidad de la Iglesia, e incluirán a algunas personas con distancia crítica del liderazgo institucional de la Iglesia”.La resolución también requiere que el equipo de trabajo “responda directamente a la Convención General, independiente de otras estructuras de gobierno, para que mantenga un alto grado de autonomía”.La Convención dijo que el equipo de trabajo “recogerá información e ideas de congregaciones, diócesis y provincias, y de otros individuos y organizaciones interesadas, incluidos aquellos de los que con frecuencia no se tienen noticias; empleará otros recursos para brindar información y orientación, e invitará a todos los interesados a unirse en oración mientras ellos se dedican a esta labor de discernimiento compartida”.El equipo de trabajo llevará a cabo un encuentro especial con representantes de todas las diócesis para recibir respuestas a las recomendaciones que se propone presentar en la próxima reunión de la Convención, a celebrarse en Salt Lake City. La resolución requiere que la representación a ese encuentro incluya “al menos” un obispo, un diputado laico, un diputado clerical y una persona menor de 35 años de cada diócesis. Puede también incluir representantes de instituciones y comunidades tales como órdenes religiosas, seminarios y comunidades con un propósito común.La fecha y lugar de este encuentro especial se determinará más adelante.El equipo de trabajo debe dar a conocer su informe final a la Iglesia para noviembre de 2014, decía la resolución, junto con cualesquiera resoluciones necesarias para aplicar sus recomendaciones.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Feb 18, 2013 El equipo de trabajo para reformar la estructura de la Iglesia se reúne por primera vez La obispa primada y la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados comparten sus puntos de vista sobre la tarea a emprender Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Bishop Paul Lambert is new Brotherhood of St. Andrew chaplain

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Brotherhood of St. Andrew press release] Diocese of Dallas Bishop Suffragan Paul Lambert has been named chaplain of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew.Bishop Lambert was introduced June 20 during the Brotherhood’s National Council meeting at the Hilton Garden Inn near Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.“We’re honored Bishop Lambert will be our spiritual leader,” Brotherhood President Robert Dennis said. The Brotherhood of St. Andrew has more than 4,000 members in 390 Episcopal and Anglican churches in the U.S. and thousands more worldwide. “I’m looking forward to working with him to further the Brotherhood’s goal of bringing men and youth to Jesus Christ.”Bishop Lambert is a Brotherhood Life Member.“Always remember your story,” Bishop Lambert told Brothers, who are dedicated to bringing Jesus Christ to men and boys. “If you do that, nothing can stop the Brotherhood. Remember – Jesus started with just 12 men.”The new Brotherhood chaplain was elected the seventh Bishop Suffragan of the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas March 29, 2008 at The Cathedral of St. Matthew’s in Dallas. For the previous six years he was Canon to the Ordinary under Bishop James M Stanton. For 15 prior years he was rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church in Texarkana, Texas.A Reno, Nevada native, Paul Lambert attended Nashotah House Theological Seminary where he graduated with a Masters of Divinity in May of 1975. Two days later he married Sally Lynne Nicholls before moving to his first Cure at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Modesto, California and St. Matthias’ Episcopal Church in Oakdale, California. Their twin daughters Claire Marie and Rebecca Anne were born in 1976. The family then moved to Taft, California where Lambert served as Vicar of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. Two years later, he was called as a Curate at the Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration in Dallas.In 1978, Bishop Lambert was called as rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Great Bend, Kansas and later yoked St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Lyons, Kansas. After three years he was called as an assistant for Holy Nativity Episcopal Church in Plano, Texas – and has stayed in Texas ever since.  It was from there he was called as rector of St. James’ Episcopal Church in Texarkana  in 1987, serving there until 2002 until Bishop Stanton called him as his Canon to the Ordinary where he has served until his election to bishop.Bishop Lambert and Sally have three children: Claire and Rebecca, 36, and Megan Elizabeth who graduated from the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee . They have four grandchildren, two boys and two girls.He succeeds Bishop Keith Whitmore of the Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta. Tags Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Paul Lambert is new Brotherhood of St. Andrew chaplain Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET July 7, 2015 at 12:28 pm Bishop Lambert, Ethel and I are in Dallas right now. We are looking forward to finding St. Matthew’s to see where you worship. We are still building our Church in Eagle, Alaska and are so very thankful for the work you and the crew did last year. That is one long plane ride and we appreciate the time and effort youwent through to get to Eagle . God Bless you! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Joanne Wallis says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC People Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Aug 6, 2013 Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

Centro comunitario de Delaware ayuda a los necesitados y combate…

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Por Sharon SheridanPosted Oct 10, 2013 Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Raheim Pope responde una llamada sobre la ayuda al alquiler de su nuevo apartamento. Pope buscó ayuda en el Centro de Recursos Comunitarios de Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, a fin de garantizar los fondos necesarios para cumplir con la fecha de pago luego que tuviera que mudarse de la vivienda que alquilaba anteriormente Foto de Sharon Sheridan.[Episcopal News Service] Habiendo vivido durante mucho tiempo al borde de la pobreza, él está de nuevo a punto de quedarse sin techo. Kevin, que ahora tiene 51, fue empleado durante 30 años —incluso tuvo su propio negocio de pintura durante un tiempo— pero ahora se las agencia con trabajos de corto plazo en jardinería o en la construcción.“Va a mejorar”, afirma él. “Uno debe tener una visión positiva de las cosas. Tienes que lograr mantener la cabeza en alto”.Uno de los sitios donde él encuentra esperanza y ayuda es en el Centro de Recursos Comunitarios, que queda justo a la salida de la autopista en Rehoboth Beach. Abrió sus puertas en abril de 2011 y atiende a individuos y familias vulnerables del distrito escolar de Cape Henlopen: evaluando sus necesidades; proporcionando asistencia económica y ayuda en asuntos tales como información sobre presupuesto, salud y empleo; y relacionándolos con servicios estatales y otros recursos. Además de conectar a los clientes con varios servicios y agencias de financiación sociales, el centro cuenta con una despensa de emergencia y ofrece un lugar donde poder usar una computadora, disfrutar de esparcimiento e intercambio social, comer un almuerzo caliente, darse una ducha y lavar ropa.Integrado casi en su totalidad por voluntarios capacitados, el centro es auspiciado por la Asociación de Iglesias de Lewes-Rehoboth, que incluye 20 iglesias de la zona de Rehoboth, Lewes y Milton en el sur de Delaware. Su apertura significó el paso a seguir de una serie de servicios comunitarios en una región que se destacaba tanto por la riqueza de un balneario como la pobreza de muchos que viven y trabajan allí, o que desean hacerlo.El prevenir y romper los ciclos de adicción, falta de vivienda, encarcelamiento y desesperanza al proporcionar ayuda temporal o de emergencia siempre ha sido una misión fundamental de la asociación, dijo el Rdo. Jeff Ross, que la preside y es el rector de la iglesia episcopal de San Pedro [St. Peter’s Episcopal Church] en Lewes.“La asociación de clérigos vino primero, y luego decidieron ocuparse de administrar una tienda de artículos usados para hacer al mismo tiempo lo que llamaron Echar-una Mano. Y Echar una Mano se transformó en el Centro de Recursos Comunitarios”, explicó. El centro ha servido a más de 4.000 individuos y familias, y ha proporcionado más de $300.000 en viviendas de emergencia, ayuda para vivienda a largo plazo, ayuda para [el pago de] servicios públicos y otras necesidades tales como medicinas, reparación de autos y muebles.Irene Simpler, asistente social jubilada y feligresa de la iglesia episcopal de Todos los Santos [All Saints’ Episcopal Church] en Rehoboth Beach, que falleció en julio, fundó Echar una Mano. “El objetivo era darle una mano a la gente”, dijo el Rdo. Max Wolf, rector de Todos los Santos y de la parroquia de San Jorge [St. George’s Chapel], en Harbeson.Un núcleo de 12 a 15 voluntarios provenientes de varias iglesias trabajaron para ayudar a que las personas conservaran sus hogares, pagándoles las cuentas pendientes y encontrando comida para sus familias, agregó. Al hacer gran parte de su trabajo por teléfono,  llegaron a darse cuenta de que “no habían había suficiente interacción social con las personas ni [era posible ofrecerles] suficiente apoyo”.La apertura del centro consolidó y aumentó el apoyo, al proporcionar una especie de “sitio único” para servicios, dijo Ross. Un asistente social del estado trabaja en el centro un día a la semana, aliviando así el agobio de algunos clientes que antes tenían que tomar varios autobuses para viajar 20 y 30 kilómetros hasta una oficina del estado.Localizada en las inmediaciones de la Ruta 1 en Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, el Centro de Recursos Comunitarios, auspiciado por una asociación de 20 iglesias de la localidad, ha servido a más de 4.000 individuos y familias y ha brindado ayuda por más de $300.000 desde su apertura en abril de 2011. Un banco de alimentos también funciona en el lugar. Foto de Sharon Sheridan.En el nuevo local, “podíamos evaluar mucho mejor las necesidades de la gente”, dijo Bennett Connolly, un miembro de San Pedro y director fundador del centro. “Estamos mucho más accesibles”. Su clientela mensual aumentó de aproximadamente 30 personas en Echar una Mano a 120 en el centro.Un asesor de casos, uno de los cuatro empleados a sueldo, trabaja 15 horas semanales. “Su trabajo fundamental es con las personas sin hogar”, que constituyen el 20 por ciento de los clientes del centro, dijo Connolly. “La mayoría de los clientes son esas familias que están a punto de quedarse sin techo, a quienes les han cortado la electricidad”.Raheim Pope, de 31 años, llegó al centro un día de finales de agosto en busca de fondos de emergencia para viviendas. Él está empleado y cría a una hija de 5½ años cuya madre murió en un accidente automovilístico en la Ruta 1 hace tres años.“Yo no gasto mucho dinero. Gasto la mayor parte de mi dinero en mi hija”, dijo.Cuando el contrato de su anterior alquiler estaba por terminarse, encontró un nuevo apartamento, pero iba a perder el depósito si no podía pagar el alquiler del primer mes a tiempo. Sabía que él tendría suficiente dinero para cubrirlo, contando con su propio cheque y el de su novia, así como el pago de la Seguridad Social de su hija, pero no hasta después de la fecha tope. El centro dijo que podría proporcionarle algún dinero, igualado por los fondos de otra agencia.Algunos clientes y empleados se reúnen para almorzar en el Centro de Recursos Comunitarios, auspiciado por la Asociación de Iglesias de Lewes-Rehoboth en el sur de Delaware. Al centro lo administran fundamentalmente voluntarios capacitados y es financiado en gran medida por una tienda de artículos de uso que dirige la asociación. La comunidad también ha brindado ayuda; por ejemplo, cuando se remodeló el local, la sucursal bancaria del PNC donó algunos muebles. Foto de Sharon Sheridan.Esta fue la primera vez que Pope visitaba el centro. Dijo que él intenta ser un buen ejemplo para su hija  esforzándose en trabajar para ser autosuficiente.“No quiero pedirles cosas a un montón de gente” recalcó. “No queda más remedio que trabajar. Yo sería un hipócrita si no lo intentara por mis medios”.Dawnya Bland, de casi 20 años, visitó el centro tres semanas después de la muerte de su padre en busca de ayuda para encontrar fondos que le permitieran regresar a su segundo año de universidad en Dover.“Vine aquí para que me ayudaran con el dinero para entrar en la escuela”, explicó. “De repente se aparecieron con una factura de $1.200. Es para el pago de mi matrícula del primer mes”.Otra estudiante, Taylor Harris, también de 20 años, dijo que buscaba ayuda económica para pagar la escuela. Aunque cambié de una universidad de fuera del estado a una local, agregó, “la escuela siempre va a ser cara”.En esta ocasión, llegó al centro para usar la computadora a fin de solicitar un empleo.“El personal aquí es estupendo” dijo. “Es un buen recurso para un montón de gente. Ofrecen muchísimas cosas aquí”Ministerio dirigido por voluntariosUnos 50 miembros de la comunidad trabajan de voluntarios en el centro, dijo el codirector Larry Beach.Otros voluntarios ayudan con la despensa y con las tiendas de artículos usados que se encuentra cerca y que proporciona gran parte de los ingresos del centro. “Administrar la tienda de artículos usados requiere más de 100 voluntarios”, explicó Ross.Beach y Wally Johnson, que coordinan las relaciones públicas del centro, estaban sentados en los bancos de San Jorge cuando Wolf anunció sus planes para establecer el centro.“Wally y yo nos miramos en medio del oficio y le dije, ‘nunca he sido llamado antes, y siento que estoy siendo llamado’”,  contó Beach. “Eso fue una verdad para mí”.Los voluntarios vienen con el deseo de “retribuir”, agregó él.Se quedan, dijo Carol Wzorek,  que administra el centro de día, porque “vemos los resultados en el acto”.“A veces, es un lugar difícil”, añadió.Con frecuencia, los nuevos clientes llegan llorando, dijo la recepcionista Eleanor Whaley. “Uno trata de consolarlos. Eso es parte de lo que yo hago. A la hora en que salen por la puerta, me abrazan. Ya se les ha secado el llanto”.El trabajar allí también ha secado las lágrimas de Eleanor. “Cuando vine, estaba sufriendo por la pérdida de mi hijo”, contó Whaley.  “Me sacó de esa situación. Para mí ha sido como un proceso de restauración… el ser capaz también de ayudar a otros”.Los edades de los clientes oscilan entre 19 y 80, explicó Wzorek. Ella recordaba a una mujer que estaba viviendo en un motel con sus hijos. “Trataba de convencerlos de que estaban de vacaciones”.Su marido se encontraba en la cárcel; ella estaba desempleada y venía de generaciones de pobreza. El centro la ayudó a encontrar trabajo y a pagar primero el motel y luego un alquiler, después de negociar a su favor con el dueño de casa. Más adelante la familia se mudó a una vivienda de Hábitat.No sólo que el cliente lo ha hecho bien, sino que ella también se ha convertido en un modelo a seguir para sus tres hijos, abundó Wzorek. “Es un cambio de rumbo sorprendente para alguien que en verdad no tenía nada, excepto el deseo de mejorar”.En la actualidad, la mujer es miembro de la junta directiva del centro, dijo Beach, resaltando que ellos se esfuerzan en garantizar que sus clientes sean tratados como socios.“Siempre les pregunto a las personas que vienen en qué pueden contribuir para resolver el problema”, dijo Wzorek.La desaceleración económica y la falta de financiación para programas sociales sujetos al embargo del presupuesto han aumentado la necesidad de ayuda de las personas, dijo Beach.Pero la geografía también acrecienta la necesidad, ya que los empleos no calificados desaparecen durante el “tiempo muerto” en la zona del balneario, explicó Wzorek. “Tenemos a personas que están atrapados en un ciclo. Les resulta muy difícil romperlo”.Incluso si tienes un empleo, “si dejas un día o dos de trabajar, te echan”, agregó ella. “El ambiente laboral es muy inestable”.“La vivienda es muy cara y muy limitada”, añadió la codirectora Janis Bordi. Las personas que visitan la zona no se dan cuenta de que “la razón de que puedan sentarse en un restaurante y ser servidos se debe a los pobres”.Y no se fijan en las tiendas de campaña donde viven personas cerca del local de Wal-Mart, dijo Johnson. “La gente no ve eso. Ven las casa de un millón de dólares”.Incluso los empleos de temporada no resultan tan fáciles de encontrar como era en un tiempo, dijo Kevin. “Cada año es la misma cosa. Viene el invierno y el trabajo disminuye. Ahora [esa situación] se está extendiendo a lo largo de todo el año; hay demasiadas personas aquí ahora, y no hay suficientes empleos. Los estudiantes de intercambio ocupan hasta el 60 por ciento de los empleos de restaurantes. Es un buen programa el de ellos, pero afecta a los vecinos de la localidad”.Y una nueva oleada de clientes mayores puede aparecer.“Estamos preparándonos para un nuevo tipo de cliente”, dijo Beach. “En nuestra zona está aumentando el número de jubilados que se han visto afectados por la economía”.Las apariencias pueden ser engañosas, hizo notar él. Alguien a quien ves conduciendo un Cadillac nuevo, “podría tener problemas para pagar la cuenta de la electricidad. Este es un fenómeno nuevo para el cual el mundo tiene que prepararse”.“Tengo un amigo”, dijo Johnson, “que era abogado en la Calle K en Washington, D.C. Y ahora es mesero de un restaurante en Rehoboth. Él y su esposa lo perdieron todo”.En tanto ayudan a clientes individuales y sus familias, los voluntarios del centro también se enfrentan a problemas mayores. Trabajar juntos en una ubicación centralizada les ha permitido identificarse y aunar esfuerzos para intentar resolver problemas subyacentes tales como el inadecuado transporte público.Gran parte del transporte público de la zona deja de funcionar cuando se acaba la temporada. “Así como desparecen los empleos, también lo hace el transporte”, dijo Wzorek.Un viaje de 16 kilómetros se convierte en un trayecto largo y arduo. “Ir de tu casa en Milton a Rehoboth toma dos horas y 35 minutos en autobús”, agregó Johnson.“Estamos tratando de abordar esos problemas”, afirmó él. Capacitar a las personas para conseguir un lugar de trabajo y “vamos a ver una disminución en la carencia de viviendas”, subrayó. “Quieren trabajar”.El trabajar juntos les da a los miembros de la asociación una influencia añadida. “Contar con 20 iglesias constituye una palanca poderosa”, dijo Beach.El centro también está asociado con otras organizaciones y puede negociar de un modo en que sus clientes no pueden. Por ejemplo, la compañía eléctrica Delmarva “trabajará con nosotros de una manera que no haría con un cliente individual”, agregó Wzorek. “Los dueños de casas también conversan con nosotros”.E incluso cuando no pueden brindar la asistencia que un cliente busca, ayudan en lo que pueden.“Ayer vino una mujer. No pudimos ayudarla, pero pudimos darle un par de zapatos nuevos”, contó Wzorek.Aunque el centro está auspiciado por una asociación de iglesias, no hace proselitismo, dijo Wolf. “Escuchamos a las personas y respetamos su dignidad”.“En verdad vemos nuestro papel como un encuentro con las personas tal como son”, dijo Ross. “Nuestro ministerio consiste en compartir el amor de Cristo con ellas y esperamos que al ayudarlas a levantarse de nuevo puedan ponerse en contacto con quienes son como seres espirituales y rehacer sus vidas dentro de ese contexto. Sí tenemos gente que se ha incorporado a nuestras congregaciones debido a esa experiencia… pero tampoco utilizamos esto como una ocasión para imponerle a nadie una identidad espiritual a cambio de cubrir sus necesidades humanas básicas”.Y apuntó Bordi, “Las personas en muchas ocasiones tienen que hacer dejación de amor propio para entrar aquí, y eso es duro. Cuando se marchan, ya lo han recuperado”.– Sharon Sheridan es corresponsal de ENS. Traducción de Vicente Echerri Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Centro comunitario de Delaware ayuda a los necesitados y combate los problemas subyacentes de la pobreza Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

Anglican, Oriental Orthodox leaders lament Christian persecution

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ecumenical & Interreligious Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Members of the Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission at the meeting hosted at Hampton Court in England. Photo: Neil Vigers/ACNS[Anglican Communion News Service] See below for the official CommuniquéAnglican and Oriental Orthodox Church leaders who met at the historic Hampton Court, London, over the weekend shared not only prayer, worship and fellowship, but also their fears about the future of Christianity in the Middle East.Leading clergy and theologians from both Christian traditions met for the first Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission in 12 years. They were there to engage in theological dialogue about important questions which have kept eastern and western churches separate for centuries, while at the same time to forge deeper bonds of faith and mutual support.The dialogue’s central topic was the Holy Spirit, but Christian persecution in countries across the Middle East was inevitably a key issue.Speaking at Saturday evening’s joint vespers hosted by the Orthodox Church of St. Augustine in Surrey, General Bishop Angaelos of the Coptic Orthodox Church in the United Kingdom said, “We gather to remember our brethren in Egypt, Syria, and throughout the Middle East, where many continue to suffer persecution for their faith. Some suffer even to the extent of losing their lives, yet their faithful witness in the Middle East is a blessing to the whole church, and to the whole world.”Church of England Bishop of Gibraltar in Europe Geoffrey Rowell added, “We have reflected on our common faith in Christ, and how we speak of Him and live in Him by the life-giving work of God’s Holy Spirit. We have done that in the deep awareness of the suffering of fellow Christians in Syria, in Egypt, and in many other places. The God whom we worship and adore is the One who comes down to the lowest part of our need.”Archbishop Aphrem Karim of the Syrian Orthodox Church said, “A Latin American bishop told me, ‘If a church is not a suffering church it is not a real church’ … But Christians are also people of hope, and suffering in this world will not separate us from Christ.“What’s happening in Syria and the Middle East is the cost we have to pay for our faith. But the whole people of the Middle East, Christians and Muslims, are suffering at the hands of groups that believe they act on behalf of God. We pray for these perpetrators that they may be touched by God’s love, that they may change and see God’s face in every human being around them.”He expressed concern at the falling numbers of Christians in the Middle East; “Iraq is another country where Christians are reduced. Out of a million and a half, less than half a million remain. In Egypt, on one day some 80 churches were attacked and people were killed. We know about Turkey where Christians [totaled] 40 to 50 percent of the population less than 100 years ago. There are [now] perhaps half of one percent.”Bishop Angaelos added, “There are many who are suffering for their faith. They suffer persecution. Some suffer even to the extent of losing their lives. Yet their faithful witness in the Middle East is a blessing to the whole church, and to the whole world. The birthplace of Christianity is still a place in which Christians are witnessing every day and sometimes at great cost.”In the midst of such sadness and concern there was also joy and hope that believers from different traditions had so much to share with one another.The Rt. Rev. Christopher Hill, the Church of England bishop of Guildford, said, “When Christians welcome each other it is a mutual welcome because God in Christ welcomes us.“In my chapel, by the door, there is a place of water, to remind that me that I am a baptized Christian. Over that place there is a Coptic Orthodox icon…  In God in Christ we are mutually welcomed by God the lover of humankind.”Bishop Angaelos echoed these ecumenical sentiments, “We are blessed to have brothers and sisters in Christ who are also sharing in our vision. There are differences, but the things we have in common are far greater, and far more important.  …We are faithful to the one flock, one Shepherd.”On Sunday, Oct. 6, the commission members welcomed Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby to the Chapel Royal, Hampton Court, for its Feast of Dedication. Welby said there was “an urgency and an importance” to the commission’s meeting not least because of the need for its members to seek “God’s powerful hand” to deliver their brothers and sisters from persecution.______CommuniquéThe Anglican-Oriental Orthodox International Commission has held its second meeting 3-7 October 2013 at St Columba’s House, Woking, England. Our Churches rejoice at the resumption of this important dialogue after ten years.We greatly appreciate the hospitality offered by the Anglican Communion, the Church of England, and the Diocese of Guildford.During the course of its meeting the Commission shared in daily prayer from the various traditions represented, and considered and discussed the following papers:The Procession of the Holy Spirit (Coptic Orthodox presentation)The Filioque in the Anglican TraditionThe Filioque and Anglican ActionThe Filioque and the Armenian Orthodox TraditionThe Draft Agreed Statement on Christology (2002) and its receptionThe context in which we have met has been one of continuing concern for the countries in the Middle East in particular, as well as Kenya, Pakistan and Nigeria. Participants felt that Rev 1.9 spoke powerfully to us. ‘I, John, your brother, who share with you in Jesus, persecution and the kingdom and the patient endurance, was on the island called Patmos, because of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus.’On Saturday 5 October we worshipped in the Coptic Orthodox Church of St Augustine, Gomshall, Surrey. Through this act of worship the members of the Commission, together with local church members, prayed and expressed solidarity with the peoples at the heart of suffering.At the service, Bishop Angaelos said, ‘We gather to remember our brethren in Egypt, Syria, and throughout the Middle East, where many continue to suffer persecution for their Faith. Some suffer even to the extent of losing their lives, yet their faithful witness in the Middle East is a blessing to the whole Church, and to the whole world.’Bishop Geoffrey Rowell added, ‘We have reflected on our common faith in Christ, and how we speak of Him, and live in Him, by the life-giving work of God’s Holy Spirit. We have done that in the deep awareness of the suffering of fellow Christians in Syria, in Egypt, and in many other places. The God whom we worship and adore is the One who comes down to the lowest part of our need.’On Sunday 6 October members of the Commission were welcomed to the Eucharist at The Chapel Royal, Hampton Court, for its Feast of Dedication, and were joined by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Revd Justin Welby. In greeting them Archbishop Justin said, ‘We meet with an urgency and importance to meeting, which is together to seek God’s powerful hand to deliver the people of Christ, who seek only to serve him and serve their people.’ We express our thanks for his presence with us and his encouragement for the work of this dialogue. We are also deeply grateful to his predecessor Dr Rowan Williams for his significant work in reviving this dialogue.The Commission shares the joy of the Coptic Orthodox Church at the enthronement of its new Pope and Patriarch, His Holiness Pope Tawadros II, and of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church at the enthronement of its new Patriarch, His Holiness Abune Matthias I.The third meeting of the Commission is planned to take place in Cairo, Egypt, in October 2014, hosted by the Coptic Orthodox Church, addressing the themes of ecclesiology, primacy and collegiality, and pastoral co-operation.At the conclusion of the dialogue the Commission thanked God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, for the unity that they experienced and shared.Members of the Commission:AnglicanThe Rt Revd Dr Geoffrey Rowell (Co-Chair)The Church of EnglandThe Most Revd Dr Michael JacksonThe Church of IrelandThe Revd Canon Harold NahabedianThe Anglican Church of CanadaThe Rt Revd Duleep de ChickeraThe Church of CeylonThe Revd Canon Dr William TaylorThe Church of EnglandThe Very Revd Dr Samy ShehataThe Episcopal Church of Jerusalem and the Middle EastThe Rt Revd Jonathan GoodallThe Church of EnglandThe Rt Revd Clive HandfordThe Church of England (Unable to attend the meeting)The Revd Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan (Co-Secretary)Anglican Communion OfficeMr Neil Vigers (Administrator)Anglican Communion OfficeOriental OrthodoxCoptic Orthodox Church of AlexandriaHis Eminence Metropolitan Bishoy (Co-Chair)Egypt (Unable to attend the meeting)His Grace Bishop Angaelos (Acting Co-Secretary)EnglandArmenian Apostolic Orthodox Church – Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin, ArmeniaHis Eminence Archbishop Hovnan DerderianUSAThe Very Revd Archimandrite Shahe AnanyanArmeniaArmenian Apostolic Orthodox Church – Holy See of Cilicia, Antelias – LebanonHis Eminence Archbishop Nareg Alemezian (Acting Co-Chair)LebanonHis Grace Bishop Shahe PanossianKuwaitEthiopian Orthodox Tewahido ChurchHis Grace Archbishop Abba GabrielEthiopiaHis Grace Archbishop Abba YacobSouth AfricaMalankara Orthodox Syrian ChurchThe Revd Fr Dr KM GeorgeIndia (Unable to attend the meeting)Syrian Orthodox Church of AntiochHis Eminence Archbishop Mor Cyril Aphrem KarimUSAHis Eminence Archbishop Mor Gregorios JosephIndia (Unable to attend the meeting) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Anglican, Oriental Orthodox leaders lament Christian persecution Anglican Communion, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By ACNS staffPosted Oct 8, 2013 Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

California diocese’s first eco-confirmation hailed a success

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Joseph Peters-MathewsPosted May 15, 2014 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Douglas M. Carpenter says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN May 16, 2014 at 8:09 am Nice going Mark. We miss you in Alabama. – the Rev. Douglas M. Carpenter Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET May 15, 2014 at 2:57 pm Left coast eco-fascism bundled, wrapped and delivered by misguided, factually deficient clergy. The church can be thoughtful, progressive and responsive without falling prey to the latest incarnation of re-branded Marxist thought. Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Environment & Climate Change Peter Cabbiness says: Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab May 15, 2014 at 7:47 pm I haven’t a clue what set Mr. Cabbiness off. Where was the “eco-fascism” and the “re-branded Marxist thought” in the article. Nowhere. Rather, the service and the restatement of baptismal vows reflects a conscious regard for our world and our opportunity to opportunity to care for it as part of the gifts of grace for which, as Christians and Episcopalians, we are grateful. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector Albany, NY Michael Craig Patterson says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC June 25, 2017 at 1:06 pm This is a direct implementation of Agenda 21, the UNs plan to exterminate us. It is orchestrated by the rich and powerful unelected “leaders” in the world. Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (4) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rob de Heer says: Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal Diocese of California] On Saturday, May 10, the Diocese of California held its first-ever Eco-Confirmation at St. Dorothy’s Rest in Camp Meeker, California. The confirmation took place with the annual Woods to Waves health camps fundraiser hike at St. Dorothy’s. Two people renewed their baptismal vows, one person was received into The Episcopal Church, and seven people were confirmed.The Eco-Confirmation itself took place not in the chapel at St. Dorothy’s, but outside, with the gathered assembly surrounded by redwoods. The Eco-Confirmation service closely followed the Confirmation service from the Book of Common Prayer. California Bishop Marc Andrus presided. “The Earth’s story of itself is the sermon I think we needed to hear on this day, and in this place,” Andrus said during his brief remarks.The Liturgy of the Word for the Eco-Confirmation was a local modification of the Cosmic Walk originally created by Sr. Miriam MacGillis. A large basin of water, sitting in the center of a spiral of red rope on the ground, was blessed before an abridged version of the history of the universe was read. The red rope emphasized the presence of the Holy Spirit for the occasion of confirmation.The Prologue to John’s Gospel began the stations of the Cosmic Walk, and after the lesson from John, a reader shared the story of the Great Flaring Forth at the beginning of time. Other events noted in the history included the creation of stars, galaxies, and our sun; the formation of the Earth’s atmosphere; the appearance of redwoods; Jesus’ birth; and the founding of St. Dorothy’s Rest. At each station a walker poured water from the baptismal basin into bowls marking the passage of time between each event.The red rope of the spiral also reminded the gathering that throughout all of history fire and heat have led to change, growth, and development, not all of which have been good or helpful. Bishop Andrus, who brainstormed the Eco-Confirmation concept, is an outspoken commentator on the role of humanity in global climate change and the need for an amendment of life of the whole human people to restore creation that has been commended to humanity’s care. Futhermore, he consistently asks if respondents will respect the dignity of the Earth as well as every human being when making or renewing the Baptismal Covenant.The confirmations, receptions, and reaffirmations took place in the center of the spiral while those present for support sang the refrain “Veni Sancte Spiritus.” Confirmands, re-affirmers, and reception candidates were from St. James / Iglesia de Santiago, Oakland; St. Stephen’s, Orinda; Christ Church, Alameda; and Holy Trinity / La Santisima Trinidad, Richmond. The service was in Spanish and English, and those being presented represented racial and age diversity, one of the diocese’s marks of church vitality.When all candidates had been confirmed, received, or reaffirmed their vows, the assembly exchanged signs of the peace of Christ, usually a handshake or hug, before praying the Lord’s Prayer. For a dismissal, those newly strengthened on their Christian journey joined the bishop in asperging — splashing with holy water — the rest of the congregation. Participants moved to the starting point of the Woods to Waves hike as they sang, “We are marching in the light of God.”The focus on the baptismal water — with it at the center of the assembly, blessing it to begin liturgy, and having everyone splashed to remember their baptisms — emphasized that baptism is the source of all Christian ministry, including care for creation. The story of the universe in its almost 14 billion years of existence resonated deeply as the congregation was surrounded by large, towering redwoods.Some from the Eco-Confirmation service participated with over 80 people in the Woods to Waves hike to raise money and awareness for health camps at St. Dorothy’s Rest. Hikers began at St. Dorothy’s and ended the 14-mile hike at Shell Beach. Over $20,000 was raised on Saturday, and donations are still being received and counted. Every summer, St. Dorothy’s provides two weeks of camps for children with cancer and children with organ transplants.In the 113 years that St. Dorothy’s has been providing camps to critically ill children, no family has ever been charged a fee to attend. Camp St. Dorothy’s is fully funded by individual donations, outreach grants, and foundation grants. $1000 fully covers the cost for one child to attend Camp St. Dorothy’s. Further information is available here. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI California diocese’s first eco-confirmation hailed a success Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Eventslast_img read more