CSIS welcomed energy industry info about alleged threats documents show

first_imgClayton Thomas-Muller (left) at a protest in Paris. (APTN file)APTN NewsThe Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) routinely welcomed reports from the energy industry about perceived threats, and kept such information in its files in case it might prove useful later, newly disclosed documents reveal.Canada’s spy agency is supposed to retain only information that is “strictly necessary” to do its job, and the spy agency is now facing questions about whether it collected and hung on to material about groups or people who posed no real threat.Details of the CSIS practices are emerging in a case mounted by the British Columbia Civil Liberties Association (BCCLA) in the Federal Court of Canada.Clayton Thomas-Müller of Pukatawagan Cree Nation in Manitoba is a regular campaigner at demonstrations and protests at home and abroad.He said the abuses alleged by the BCCLA occurred under former prime minister Stephen Harper and could be continuing under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.“Of course, CSIS says that they’re not guilty of anything,” he said from Winnipeg Monday.“The fact of the matter is we have no reason to think anything’s changed from the Harper era to the Trudeau era.”In a February 2014 complaint to the CSIS watchdog, the Security Intelligence Review Committee, the BCCLA alleged the spy service overstepped its legal authority by monitoring environmentalists opposed to Enbridge’s now-abandoned Northern Gateway pipeline proposal.It also accused CSIS of sharing information about the opponents with the National Energy Board and petroleum industry companies, effectively deterring people from voicing their opinions and associating with environmental groups.The review committee dismissed the civil liberties association’s complaint in 2017, prompting the association to ask the Federal Court to revisit the outcome.In the process, more than 8,000 pages of once-secret material, including heavily redacted transcripts of closed-door hearings, have become public, providing a glimpse into the review committee’s deliberations.During one hearing, a CSIS official whose identity is confidential told the committee that information volunteered by energy companies was put in a spy service database.“It is not actionable. It just sits there,” the CSIS official said. “But should something happen, should violence erupt, then we will go back to this and be able to see that we had the information? It is just information that was given to us, and we need to log it.“Should something happen after and we hadn’t logged it, then we are at fault for not keeping the information.”Civil libertiesThe review committee heard from several witnesses and examined hundreds of documents in weighing the civil liberties association’s complaint.The watchdog concluded CSIS collected some information about peaceful anti-petroleum groups, but only incidentally in the process of investigating legitimate threats to projects such as oil pipelines.Advocacy and environmental groups Leadnow, the Dogwood Initiative, and the Council of Canadians are mentioned in the thousands of pages of CSIS operational reports scrutinized by the review committee.But the committee’s report said that CSIS’s activities did not stray into surveillance of organizations engaged in lawful advocacy, protest or dissent.A CSIS witness testified the spy service “is not in the business of investigating environmentalists because they are advocating for an environmental cause, period.”Still, the review committee urged CSIS to ensure it was keeping only “strictly necessary” information, as spelled out in the law governing the spy service.And Thomas-Müller offered this advice – albeit sarcastically.“I know that when I’m not spying on people I’m not generating thousands of redacted pages of documents,” he cracked.Chilling effectThe civil liberties association told the committee of a chilling effect for civil society groups from the spy service’s information-gathering as well as comments by then-natural resources minister Joe Oliver denouncing “environmental and other radical groups.”One CSIS witness told the committee that Oliver’s statement did not flow from information provided by the spy agency.“As a service, we never found out where he was coming from, where he got this information or who had briefed him,” the unnamed CSIS official said. “So we’re not sure where he got it. But it wasn’t from us.”The review committee found CSIS did not share information about the environmental groups in question with the National Energy Board or the petroleum industry.The association wants the Federal Court to take a second look, given that CSIS created more than 500 operational reports relevant to the committee’s inquiry.“The main impression one draws from the (committee) report is ‘nothing to see here, look away,’ when in fact there is a lot to see here,” said Paul Champ, a lawyer for the association.Dozens of censored CSIS records say the reporting was further to “the Service’s efforts in assessing the threat environment and the potential for threat-related violence stemming from (redacted) protests/demonstrations.”Spy serviceSome of the documents reveal that CSIS itself is questioning whether it is going too far, noting that the spy service is “pressing on the limitations of our mandate.”The notion that information on some groups or individuals was gathered incidentally is “cold comfort to people whose names might end up in the databanks of Canada’s intelligence service simply because they expressed a political opinion on Facebook, signed a petition, or attended a protest,” Champ said.One document refers to the Dogwood Initiative as a “non-profit, Canadian environmental organization that was established in 1999 ‘to help communities and First Nations gain more control of the land and resources around them so they can be managed in a way that does not rob future generations for short-term corporate gain.”’The passages before and after the description are blacked out.“This court case will take some time to play out,” Champ said. “Right now, we are focused on getting access to as much information as possible so we can properly make our main arguments about how these CSIS activities violate the law.”– With files from Kathleen Martens and the Canadian Presslast_img read more

The Cavaliers Finally Sped Up

During the regular season, the Cleveland Cavaliers did not run very much. Head coach Tyronn Lue has been preaching the virtues of a faster-paced offense since he took over for David Blatt in January. It was slow to catch on. The Cavaliers were the third-slowest team during the season, using fewer possessions per game than the glacial Memphis Grizzlies or the ancient San Antonio Spurs, and in the playoffs, they’ve become even slower. It was easy to laugh about Lue suggesting after a Game 1 drubbing at the hands of the Golden State Warriors last week that the Cavaliers simply needed to pick up the pace. And when Cleveland was flattened again in Game 2, that book appeared to be closed.But in Game 3, on Wednesday night, the Cavs came out hot — and fast. They went up 33-13 in the first quarter and blew out the Warriors 120-90. For the game, they were 8-for-16 with between 22 and 18 seconds left on the shot clock (the sweet spot for the seven-seconds-or-less school of pace) after going just 8-for-19 in the first two games of the Finals combined.The Warriors, meanwhile, are getting just 8.3 shots per game in that range. This might seem like a positive to those who listened to pundits talk about the “quick shots” that were sinking Golden State against the Oklahoma City Thunder. But during the regular season, the Warriors were absolutely unstoppable early in the shot clock: They averaged 14.9 of those field goals per game, including 6.2 3-point attempts; their shooting averages were 65.7 percent from two and 47.9 percent on those threes, for an effective field goal percentage (eFG%) of 68.3, which led the league, though not by much.The team in second place? Those plodding Cavaliers. The Cavs had an eFG% of 66.1 on seven-seconds-or-less plays, and the gap between them and the third-place Atlanta Hawks (62.7) is about the same as the gap between the Hawks and the 13th-place Thunder (59.2). LeBron James was more efficient in possessions of this sort than Klay Thompson or Steph Curry was — even in a year in which his 3-point stroke inexplicably cratered. The difference is, the Cavs had only 9.6 attempts per game early in the clock, more than five fewer than the Warriors.But go ahead and read that back to yourself: The Warriors ran over the league using pace and shooting, but the Cavs, when they deigned to break from trot to gallop, played their game nearly as well as the defending champs. For the Cavs to pull off an upset in this series, more stars will have to align than merely their finding some pep in their step and playing a 35-year-old benchwarmer major minutes. But a few have begun to slide into place: Irving, a hugely talented offensive player, found his stroke after going quiet for the first two games, and Curry has looked genuinely out of sorts for most of the series. While it’s still a very long shot that the Cavaliers can come back and win the Finals, it’s a far better one than if they’d gone down 3-0 playing old and slow.Check out our latest NBA predictions.Our sports podcast Hot Takedown discusses the NBA Finals. Of course, “early shot clock” possessions are often just another name for transition or semi-transition (that little window after a fast break ends but before the defense can get set). By the Game 3 box score, Cleveland outscored Golden State 15-8 on fast-break points, and according to the player-tracking data, the Cavs had 18 transition chances to the Warriors’ nine and did a little better per play. Transition begins with defense, and after reportedly getting a wake-up call from assistant coach Phil Handy, the Cavs were noticeably more lively on that end in Game 3. Kyrie Irving’s numbers weren’t great (player-tracking has him on the hook for allowing 63.3 eFG% on 15 shots), but he was making a visible effort; J.R. Smith and Iman Shumpert were both much better than they had been, though, and Richard Jefferson, who started for Kevin Love (ruled out because of a blow to the head), was all over the court, closing out and contesting shots. He ended up allowing opponents to shoot just 45.5 eFG% on 11 attempts. read more

Abaco man death suspected suicide say Police

first_img Related Items:#HopeTownLighthouse, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, August 15, 2017 – Abaco – Police suspect it is a suicide and say foul play is not suspected at this time after a 41 year old man of Hope Town, Abaco was found at the #HopeTownLighthouse on Saturday.    Police were called to the scene around 10am and found the body unresponsive.The man was taken to the Marsh Harbour Clinic where he was pronounced dead by a doctor.    There will be an autopsy to say for sure, how the man died.last_img

Bhavaya Chawla – The MultiTasker Who Is Rising High With His Brand

first_imgLucky are those who are blessed with good looks and even have a good physique. Bhavaya Chawla is one such exception who is an entrepreneur, a model and a public figure. He is the founder of ‘BUILT NATURAL’, a bold performance sportswear brand, made with eco-friendly technologies to make you the better version of yourself. He is a firm believer of building body naturally rather than preferring shortcuts.With having a wide presence on the social media, Bhavaya has also been featured on many news channels and newspapers. He has also been collaborating with many YouTube channels in order to make people aware about natural fitness rather than the use of steroids. Moreover, he is completely against the use of steroids in bodybuilding.Apart from being in the sports and fitness industry, the young entrepreneur is also flying high in the modelling world. He has closely been working with many brands like Coke, Nokia, Shivan & Narresh Swimwear and has also done photo shoots for them. Not only this, Bhavaya had also set the ramp on fire when he walked at the Wills Fashion Week, India.His professional side does not end here. He is also the director of JaiRaj Group of Industries which holds the expertise in manufacturing automotive components & plastic products since the last 33years. Being a fitness blogger always felt like a sense of responsibility to him and today he is inspiring thousands of people with fitness as his main force. When asked about his brand, ‘Built Natural’, he said that he has a lot of plans for it to take it across the globe and will let everyone know in the coming days.IBT does not endorse any of the above content.last_img read more

One morning in the life of some Indians

first_imgKalu Miyan heard the good news from Rameshwar when he was sitting under a tree near the canal. For early morning rituals the villagers use this part of the grazing ground. Men come little after sunrise. By then the women return. Neither Kalu Miyan nor Ramu Chacha is aware that their village is among those in the country that has stopped open defecation. They had heard that the few broken bricks stacked in the corner of the village will eventually become the village toilet. They heard that some Babus (government functionaries) from the town had come to their village one day before these bricks were laid. That was before the rains came, and Ramu helped Kalu Miyan to till his land. Also Read – Gateway of criminal justiceBoth Kalu Miyan and Ramu Chacha sat on a light bedstead with Pavan, their village elder and heard on the radio the Pradhan Mantri from Delhi mentioning something about Swachh Bharat. Pavan, who knows some Babus in the town, told them that their village will have toilets. Villagers know that any construction takes time. The bridge on the canal has been under construction for some time. Ramu remembers that it had started when his youngest son Chhotu was born. Now Chhotu is living in Begusarai, some 50 km away from the village. He goes to school, where there are no classes. The boy, now ten years old, works at a shop and earns a livelihood. Also Read – Turning a blind eyeRamu Chacha has a radio on his phone. He bought it recently from the money he received in his bank account after the Babus came and opened bank accounts about a year back. In the past, only well off persons, such as Kalu Miyan and Pavan had ever visited a bank. Ramu and his family were elated when for the first time they entered a bank. One year before the bank Babus came for account-opening, they had gone to the local Panchayat in a village just a few kilometers north, to get themselves photographed and get their fingerprints registered. Their eyes were also tested. The Babus told them that all these details would be printed on a card that would come from the post office. Pavan told all of them to keep that card (called Aadhar) safely. But that was used only once when the bank Babus came. Ramu Chacha heard on the radio that the Bara Adalat (Supreme Court) in Delhi has now addressed their concern. It is unknown to Ramu and his fellow villagers that the Aadhar card is wrong. It is wrong because all their information is stored on that card. But Ramu could not follow what was wrong in it. The details of the money that helped him buy the radio was also stored on that card.Gagan, son of his elder brother, knows many things. He even goes to towns to walk with political Babus. Gagan explained to Ramu Chacha what privacy is and how the Aadhar system was breaching his privacy. Not only Ramu, but all villagers must thank the Bara Adalat for securing their right to privacy. This is what Rameshwar explained to Kalu Miyan while relieving himself in the fields. Maybe Kalu Miyan was suffering from constipation and did not seem thankful to the Bara Adalat.When Kalu Miyan and Ramu Chacha were busy in a remote village in the morning, it was time for the senior Sarkari Sahib (government official) to get ready for work. He had just returned from his morning walk and barely had any time left to glance through the newspaper. He must reach office now before nine – a trouble that started when Narendra Modi came to New Delhi from Gandhinagar. Not only must he reach office on time, but there are also new slogans nowadays – “Make in India” and Ease of Doing Business. What hurts the senior Babu more is that his boss, Mr. Burden Remove Boast travels the world, gets photographed with Modi, tweets his achievements, and sends all papers to him, the Hump Ahmed. When well-paid officers from foreign companies visit him, the poor man has little option and maintains a smiling face. Like the man who laughs poor Hump can never express his problems to anybody.On his table is a proposal for a big MNC, which is keen to venture out in the Indian market. As such there is no issue now that the confusing language kept in the notification has been done away with few months back. The Sahib knows of the brand and uses the same given to him by the Indian franchise of the company. The issue is one of level playing field. If the MNC opens its store, the poor Indian franchise will lose his revenue. Shouldn’t the Government act as a guardian for the Indian business person? Instead, the Prime Minister is busy going abroad and talking to these MNCs.But Hump Sahib knows how not to bend easily. He has to ensure fairness for all. Leaders come and go, but Sahibs are constant. What can the leaders do without the Sahibs? And what is the incentive Hump Sahib may receive from the MNC? A mere thank you, one supposes. Now Hump Sahib is not interested in easing it anymore; let the Prime Minister keep shouting his Mann Ki Baat.By the time Kalu Miyan and Ramu Chacha were ready to tend to their respective fields, and Hump Sahib had finished his second cup of coffee brought by his servant, it was time for anchor Rubbish Desai to call his stringer in Bihar. Rubbish wanted a big breaking story on how Modi’s Swatch Bharat data on toilets were rigged and how Kalu Miyan, Ramu Chacha, et al. were still using the village green. He has also lined up the well-known guest who will explain how this Government manipulates all information with active support from the highest office. Meanwhile, Rubbish receives a call from his reporter from the capital. The young lady has access to a senior Sahib, who tells her how the Government is slowly killing the Indian entrepreneurs to promote MNCs. With two news night top stories frozen, Rubbish went for his lunch at Machan where there is a Tunisian food festival to celebrate this year’s Nobel Prize. (The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Beyond the Privacy Fine Print Making Privacy More Transparent

first_img How Success Happens 5 min read Listen Now Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. The past few weeks saw a series of news articles that focused consumer concern around personal data use (and misuse). Recently, it was revealed that email service Unroll.me anonymously used consumer email data to give companies like Uber visibility into subscriber spending habits. While there was nothing illegal in Unroll.me’s use of data, seeing that its privacy agreement explicitly allowed such usage, it nevertheless surprised and alarmed consumers.As it happens, this news came on the heels of the President and Congress reversing the previous administration’s proposed FCC privacy protections. With the new law, service providers are now free to collect and sell customer data to advertiser’s surrounding a customer’s internet usage.The internet data tradeA wider reality is that the consumer internet is built on the trade of personal data. On the internet, the term “free” is rarely without strings attached considering ad supported internet services are powered by trade for personal data. Now in most, if not all, cases the personal data is de-identified of unique individual identifiers. Nevertheless, the consumer internet is built on advertising and advertising depends on personal data for targeting. What’s new is that now personal data value has decoupled from any dependency to advertisers. Personal data now has its own intrinsic value to data buyers, as the Unroll.me example revealed.Related: 3 Reasons Why Privacy Matters to Your Business, Your Brand and Your FutureThe big problem with small printGenerally speaking, consumers have some awareness that the internet services they use rely on advertising which in turn depends on their personal data. They may not always like it, but in general they assent to this quid pro quo in exchange for the services they value. The challenge for consumers, however, is that the scope of use around personal data is not always clear and often hidden behind legal terms and conditions or consent agreements that bury details in fine print. Moreover, the use of personal data beyond advertising remains less familiar to most consumers and more concerning.Gold mine or coal pit?For companies, personal data is in some ways the new gold mine. Even if companies rely on subscriber or transactional revenue, knowing their customer will invariably depend on knowing their customer data. For companies therefore collecting, processing and commercializing this data is a central function.For consumers, this has created ever growing anxiety. For them, the gold mine is more like a murky coal pit. As most interactions with corporations shift online, there is a growing sense of unease over loss of control when it comes to personal data. This explains perhaps why every so often a chain letter like a meme suddenly overruns Facebook promising to block Facebook’s use of personal data. People fear what they can’t see and the use of personal data by companies is very rarely transparent.Related: The Weirdest Things People Agree to in Terms of ServiceAccounting and accountabilityDespite privacy policies and elaborate consent agreements, consumers still fear the misuse and abuse of their personal data. They perhaps understand the value of their data but they still want accountability and therefore accounting for their data. Lack of transparency around personal data exacerbates worry over personal data misuse. Privacy policies written in legalese may indemnify corporations that collect and process the personal data, but they do little to provide consumers transparency or assurance around the use of their data.This desire to see greater accounting for personal data is reflected in the passage of new privacy regulations around the world like the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which enshrine new data accounting requirements for corporations under national penalties that can reach 10 percent of a company’s annual revenue. Regulations like GDPR do two things. Firstly, they re-align corporate responsibility to their customers around personal data. They force companies to behave more like data custodians than data owners. Companies can use personal data but only within tight parameters while preserving a consumer’s right to their data. Secondly, they force companies to account for every individual’s data. And the accounting begets accountability: Knowing the data makes a company more responsible for the data while providing consumers greater transparency around their data.Related: How to Get Google to Quit Tracking YouGoing beyond words: Operationalizing privacyAs the Unroll.me news dramatized, legal fine print for privacy is often not enough for consumers. The terms may be there, but they are written by lawyers to protect their employers and not necessarily to provide transparency to consumers. The resulting frustration is reflected in both the popularity of news that underscores the consumer’s vulnerability and also in the many new regulations proliferating around the world that aim to protect consumer data and provide them greater transparency.  For companies, the change in consumer outlook doesn’t mean that they need to abandon the use of consumer data. However, they will need to explore ways to give consumers greater confidence that the data is both safeguarded and accounted for. Privacy policies will not go away, but consumers want greater transparency and their government representatives want greater accountability. For companies this will require new approaches to operationalize privacy with clear data accounting so that companies can actually know what customer data they collect and consumers can know what data they share with the companies. May 10, 2017last_img read more

Rep Glenn applauds Midland County Project DARE

first_img Categories: Glenn News 14Mar Rep. Glenn applauds Midland County Project D.A.R.E. Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, left, congratulated Midland County Sheriff Scott Stephenson on a his successful Midland County Project D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program at a banquet in the Messiah Lutheran Church on March 13. “Midland County DARE saves young people’s lives, most importantly, and also saves tax dollars that would otherwise be required for additional law enforcement and incarceration costs,” Glenn said. “I commend Midland County Sheriff Stephenson and the Midland City Police for their leadership and commitment to this important program for Midland County youth.” The Midland County Sheriff’s office and the Midland City Police have provided D.A.R.E. training since 1990 to students in the Midland, Meridian, Bullock Creek, and Coleman public schools as well as to many parochial and private schools within Midland County. D.A.R.E.’s primary mission is to provide children with the information and skills they need to live drug-and-violence-free lives. Additionally, it establishes positive relationships between students and law enforcement, teachers, parents, and other community leaders. The program puts law enforcement officers in the classroom and allows them to interact with students for multiple weeks, instructing students on the dangers of drug abuse including its long term effects, how to stand up to peer pressure, strategies for good decision-making, and how to combat bullying in their personal and academic life. More information about Midland County Project D.A.RE. is available from the Midland County Sheriff’s office at 989-839-4600 or online at CityofMidlandMI.gov/212/DARE.last_img read more

Rep Graves votes to protect Michigans children

first_img25May Rep. Graves votes to protect Michigan’s children Categories: Graves News,News Landmark bipartisan plan approved by state HouseState Rep. Joseph Graves, of Argentine Township, today issued the following statement after the state House approved a 28-bill bipartisan plan to strengthen Michigan’s response to criminal sexual conduct by penalizing sexual predators, helping survivors and protecting Michigan’s residents:“The problem of sexual assault goes beyond what Larry Nassar did to hundreds of girls and young women, because it’s a problem at colleges, our neighborhoods and even within families. As a member of the House Law and Justice Committee, I joined my colleagues in listening to several Nassar survivors, along with parents, teachers, retired judges, advocacy organizations and subject experts who testified before the committee.“This legislation may not satisfy everybody, but each bill and the package as a whole address the problem of sexual assault in our society. I was pleased to vote ‘yes’ for each bill in committee and again on the House floor. Our committee’s work may not be done, but after a dozen hearings and nearly 20 hours of testimony on this legislation, I know our children and grandchildren will be safer because of the efforts of so many.”#####last_img read more

AE Networksowned network Lifetime is due to laun

first_imgA+E Networks-owned network Lifetime is due to launch this week in Turkey as a free-to-air channel.Lifetime Turkey will feature shows, movies and unscripted series from the Lifetime network, as well as formats adapted for a Turkish audience.The female-focused channel is due to launch tomorrow, April 26, and is designed to provide “an alternative to the usual program line-up on Turkey’s traditional television channels,” according to A+E.“With unique and rich content created over its 32-year history, Lifetime has earned numerous awards, particularly in the USA, but also all around the world, and we are proud to present Lifetime to Turkish television viewers on free-to-air TV,” said Lifetime Turkey’s founding partner and CEO, Esra Oflaz Güvenkaya.“Nowadays, all free-to-air television channels are so similar. We are pleased to provide the quality of a premiere channel in a free-to-air environment for our nation because we believe viewers and advertisers desire a free-to-air television alternative that is new and different from traditional channels.”In terms of scheduling, Lifetime Turkey will air: female-focused content in the mornings and afternoons; Turkish adaptations of popular TV programs such home design shows during prime-time; and programmes about the paranormal late at night.Lifetime Turkey is a result of a joint venture between A+E Networks and MCD Media.last_img read more

Liberty Global is going on the offensive against t

first_imgLiberty Global is going on the offensive against tech giants Google and Facebook by working collaboratively with broadcasters and the veracity and scale of data harvested from its own platforms.Laurence Miall-d’Aout“There are lots of fears about how big the threat GAFA [Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon] has become and how regulation doesn’t seem to apply to them but they don’t have the rich data about how customers behave which we do,” Laurence Miall-d’Aout, VP, data and advanced advertising, Liberty Global told Cable Congress in Dublin. “That is our data and it is up to us – and the cable industry as a whole – to harness this data better.The cable giant is developing Liberty Insights, presented as a single platform encompassing aggregated consumer data from its 24 million customers, accessed over 14 million devices and uniting 15 billion viewing hours combining customer and viewing data with third party data.It will use Machine Learning to offer insights on advertising and programming to broadcasters within its stable on a local and macro level.Broadcasters are increasingly looking to exploit data from user sign-ins and subscriptions in the hope this will lift their fortunes in an advertising market dominated by the major tech platforms. This data will be used to generate the kind of personalised content recommendations that are familiar to customers of streaming services, while it will also allow for more relevant advertising, according to Liberty Global.“Our first party data can measure against GAFA,” Miall-d’Aout declared. “We are an alternative to Facebook and Google.”It is one of a multiplicity of industry initiatives seeking to fill the void left by standard TV audience measurements which have struggled to keep pace with advertiser demand for accurate and reliable cross-platform metrics.“We cannot replace Nielsen and BARB,” she said. “Barb and Nielsen have rigourous research and methodology that we can learn from and even use for our algorithm. But our data with its granularity can provide attribution in a way TV could not offer before.”Like commercial TV broadcasters, the cable operator is looking to turn the concerns marketers such as P&G and Unilever have about brand safety into its advantage.“A lot of brands turning away from digital money and we are pushing that money back to DTV,” she said.She said Liberty offered the attributes which had enticed brands to digital platforms in the first place, namely: scale, data, attribution (accountability) and the ability to trade easily.The company is rolling out addressable advertising in its various territories. With TV3 Group, the Irish commercial broadcaster it owns, Liberty will likely launch TA this year, through the partnership between Virgin Media and rival Sky [Sky AdSmart] announced last June. [TV3 is on track to rebrand its three channels – TV3, 3e and Be3 – as Virgin Media Television in the second quarter of 2018].“We have opened up Virgin Media in the UK and Ireland where addressable ads are the beginning of the creation of a new marketplace [for addressable ads].”It has made similar moves in Belgium with cable broadband services provider Telenet.“As an ecosystem we need TV to stay relevant,” insisted Miall-d’Aout. “We need those TV broadcasters to make money and to that they can recoup some of their traditional business [from the tech giants] and that’s where our data can play a role.”“We have been historically very poor in creating a unified data sets. The data sets in our organisation have been collected in silos making it difficult to change overnight to a culture based around AI and ML.She added that the Liberty’s advanced advertising and data unit was on the hunt for ‘data scientists’ to help it adapt.“I believe if we create our own data platform we can defend ourselves against GAFA,” said Miall-d’Aout. “We can use the data to launch new product, gain new audiences, derive new data and drive innovation.”She added: “Seventy per cent of the big data initiatives are not profitable. We have the opportunity to change that at Liberty.”Liberty Global has operations in 12 European countries under the consumer brands Virgin Media, Unitymedia, Telenet and UPC. In addition, it owns 50% of VodafoneZiggo, a joint venture in the Netherlands, as well as significant content investments in ITV, All3Media, LionsGate, Formula E racing series and several regional sports networks.last_img read more