Windies fifth in ICC women’s rankings

first_imgDUBAI, UAE (CMC): Cricket’s world governing body, the International Cricket Council (ICC), launched its official women’s team rankings yesterday, with West Indies installed at number five in the table. The rankings will be based on a multi-format system, incorporating results from all three forms of the game. According to the ICC, Tests, one-day internationals (ODI) and Twenty20 (T20) will be treated equally, with rankings points available from every international game. Rankings will be based on results of the last three to four years, with the first two years being counted at only 50 per cent. Results between October 2012 and September last year have been also counted at 50 per cent, while results since October last year will be counted at 100 per cent. As expected, Australia top the rankings with 134 points, with England lying second on 124 points. New Zealand are third on 109, India fourth with 105, while the Windies are close behind on 99 points. The top eight are rounded out by sixth-placed South Africa (92), seventh-placed Pakistan (81), and Sri Lanka on 74 points. “The launch of ICC women’s team rankings is part of the ICC’s long-term commitment to investing, incentivising, promoting and publicising women’s cricket, which has already started to drive substantial increase in public interest and participation as well as a marked improvement in the standard of the international game,” the ICC said in a statement. West Indies will have a chance to improve their ranking when they face Pakistan in four ODIs and three T20s in St Lucia and Grenada later this month, and when they head to a South Africa for a similar series starting in late February. The regional side will face the Proteas in three ODIs from February 25-29 and in three T20s from March 4-9.last_img read more

Environment Dept to watchdog extractive industries

first_imgThe Department of Environment will serve as a watchdog body over the extractive industries of Guyana.President David GrangerAmid concerns about the necessity of this decision, President David Granger justified the move to delink this department from the Natural Resources Ministry, explaining that it would be counterproductive to have the entity charged with reaping the best from the extractive sectors also be tasked with protecting the environment.He was at the time responding to questions from local journalists on the recent broadcast of the weekly telecast ‘The Public Interest’.“The Department of Environment is meant to optimise the work of several units. We want to create a clearer division between the extractive industries…so the Department of Environment will be a watchdog to ensure the extractive industries do not do damage to the environment,” Granger emphasised.The Parliamentary Opposition, People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) had raised concerns about the establishment of this department. PPP/C Chief Whip Gail Teixeira had ridiculed the decision, noting that the government continues to demonstrate utter ineptitude in the management of the country.She had also contended that these constant shakeups in the public service will only undermine the sector.“They (public servants) like to know where they are, they like to know their supervisors, they like continuity, they don’t like that one morning you wake up and you are with this minister, the next morning you wake up and you’re with another minister and then suddenly you are moving back; you then find yourself making arrangements to move to another building and then suddenly you moving back to another building. This is a recipe for disaster in a public service,” she stated.Teixeira added that the situation could also arise where important files go missing as a result of the numerous moves.Furthermore, former Attorney General and Legal Affairs Minister Anil Nandlall pointed out that this move will result in financial chaos in the accounting system.“Because we had a national budget where the National Assembly approves line items situated under a particular ministry and now it is cut in half or quarter and transferred over…there are financial implications on how they will account for the money and without parliamentary scrutiny. That is why these abrupt changes are minimised because it leads to mismanagement,” he explained.At a post-Cabinet press conference on July 27, State Minister Joseph Harmon disclosed that the move to remove overview of the environment sector from the Ministry of Natural Resources was to lessen the responsibilities which lie on the shoulder of the subject Minister Raphael Trotman.He explained that in so doing, it will alleviate potential conflicts which often exist between the simultaneous management of the extractive industries and the environment.last_img read more