Disney Plus at 7 Just take this parents money already

first_img2:28 Every Pixar movie will be on Disney Plus, available to stream anytime. That includes all the Toy Stories, Cars, Inside Out, Monsters, Inc, A Bug’s Life, Finding Nemo, Finding Dory and WALL-E. It’ll also have scads of other Disney movies, including Frozen, 101 Dalmatians, Lady and the Tramp, Mary Poppins, The Parent Trap, The Little Mermaid and, yes, The Princess Diaries. Disney Plus: Every show and movie Disney confirmed What do all these titles have in common? The kids have chosen every single one for Family Movie Night, many of them more than once. A lot of The Princess Diaries went over my 3-year-old’s head, but the older girls loved it. nullNext time we watch (and rewatch) Dumbo, we’ll need Disney Plus. Disney We all watched Dumbo in the theater a couple of weeks ago — to rave kid reviews — and my girls are already talking about Frozen 2 and Toy Story 4. The oldest is begging me to let her watch Captain Marvel. All four, and more, will be available to stream (without a rental fee, four of Daddy’s favorite words) exclusively on Disney Plus. Beyond movie night there’s plenty of other kid fun in the offing. Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, Duck Tales and Dog Whisperer with Cesar Millan are shows my kids know and love. And I’m quite confident they’ll enjoy Monsters at Work and Magic of the Animal Kingdom, two exclusive TV series coming to Disney Plus in year one. disney-plus-frozen-tv-appThe Disney Plus app looks like a one-stop shop for family movie night.  Disney Think of the children! OK, $7 every month or $70 for a yearly subscription isn’t chump change, and these things add up. I can’t see myself quitting Netflix or Hulu, for example (though the promise of a discounted Disney Plus/Hulu bundle has me very interested), and there’s only so many subscriptions I can afford. Subscription fatigue is strong in this one. If Disney had priced its service at $13 (the same as Netflix) or even $10, it might be a tougher call. But there’s something about $7 that feels just right, at least for my budget. Even if that $7 subscription saves me just one $5 rental fee, it’s totally worth it — in part because Disney Plus has a bunch of other stuff that makes my parental heart twitterpate. There’s unlimited downloads, so I can pack the iPad with movies and TV shows for long car trips, camping and plane rides.My kids already love (and spend time customizing) avatars and profiles on Netflix and the Disney Now app, so they’ll be right at home with Disney Plus’ versions.It’s just a matter of time before they’re old enough to watch Star Wars and, yes, Marvel — and paying for those individually really adds up. The National Geographic stuff is the perfect parental screen time sop. It’s educational, right? Sayonara, guilt!I can have them each kick in $1 every month from their allowances and teach them the value of money. “Clean up or I’m canceling Disney Plus.”screen-shot-2019-04-12-at-11-22-34-amMy kids love customizing profiles in Netflix. I’m betting they’ll have a field day with Disney Plus. Screenshot by David Katzmaier/Netflix Seriously, you guys, I’m getting this for my kidsAs if all that kid stuff wasn’t enough, the Disney Plus fare for grownups helps justify part of that $7. Until a couple of weeks ago I wasn’t a Marvel fan, but midway through my binge-race to watch every Marvel film before Avengers: Endgame, that’s no longer the case. Turns out a lot of these comic book movies are pretty darn good, and I can even see myself wanting to rewatch a few. I’m curious about the Disney Plus spin-off series centered around The Falcon and The Winter Soldier, as well as the one about Scarlet Witch and Vision, and the upcoming films, starting with Captain Marvel and including Endgame will also find an exclusive home on Disney Plus. Of course I love Star Wars too, and until my kids are old enough to binge those flicks with me, I’d definitely watch The Mandalorian. The same goes for the final installment, Star Wars Episode 9: The Rise of Skywalker. As it is for many parents, the word Disney for me is synonymous with quality family entertainment. One of our best trips was a visit to Disneyland last summer. My father grew up in Southern California, had a lifetime pass to Disneyland and loved the classic films so much he recorded a bunch to Betamax. We’d sit around watching Robin Hood and Fantasia for my own childhood family movie nights. My kids today understand my job largely with the help of an iconic Goofy short. How to Hook Up Your Home TheaterWalt, you win again. Now, about that discounted Hulu bundle… Now playing: Watch this: More on Disney Plus Tags Toy Story 4 trailer shows Woody and Bo Peep’s long-awaited… You’ve already got a friend in me, Disney Plus Disney just announced the details of Disney Plus, its new standalone streaming service. Available Nov. 12, it costs $7 per month and sounds like our inevitable new destination for Family Movie Night. Comments Media Streamers Digital Media TV and Movies Share your voice Disney Disney Plus is the exclusive streaming home of Frozen 2. I have 9- and 8-year-old daughters named Anna and Ella. Do you think I have a choice? Disney At my house, every Friday is Family Movie Night. Three kids, aged 9, 8 and 3, take turns choosing the film they want to watch. Or rewatch. Or fight over watching for the fourth time. Their negotiations often start days before and become more heated as the fateful night approaches. On hearing that the youngest wants to watch Cars again, his sisters inevitably begin their subtle tugs toward an acceptable substitute, like Coco or Moana.  Sometimes I step in and play arbiter, especially if a movie is available “for free” as part of a subscription. “Kids, Moana isn’t on Netflix anymore, so it’s $4 to rent. How about Incredibles 2?” Usually they ignore my thrifty suggestions. “Fine,” I think to myself, “it’s just $4.” A small price to pay for entertainment harmony, and Moana is really good. But I sure would love the option to watch it, and any number of other great Disney movies, as part of an affordable subscription.  9 My #8: As a parent with kids of a certain age, do I have any way whatsoever to avoid subscribing? https://t.co/ivjlW7BxET— David Katzmaier (@dkatzmaier) April 11, 2019 Disney Plus will cost $7 a month and launch Nov. 12 Disney Plus will allow downloads for offline viewing In Disney Plus Frozen 2 teaser, Elsa’s not OKlast_img read more

Department of Justice kicks off antitrust review of tech giants

first_imgThe Justice Department is seeking feedback on the investigation from the public. Alastair Pike / AFP/Getty Images The US Department of Justice has announced an antitrust review of how online platforms achieved market power, and whether they are reducing competition, stifling innovation and harming consumers. While the Justice Department hasn’t named specific companies, it’s targeting tech giants including Apple, Alphabet, Amazon and Facebook, according to The Wall Street Journal.Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim of the antitrust division said the companies’ power could lead them to “act in ways that are not responsive to consumer demands.””The Department’s review will consider the widespread concerns that consumers, businesses, and entrepreneurs have expressed about search, social media, and some retail services online,” the DOJ added. It’s seeking feedback on the investigation from the public.The move is the latest effort by the US government to step up enforcement of tech’s biggest companies. For decades, the government largely avoided regulating or scrutinizing the tech world. That approach allowed companies like Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Google and Facebook to grow to become some of the most highly valued in the world. But, critics argue, that growth came at the expense of user privacy and competitive choices in the marketplace.Following revelations Russian propagandists used Facebook, Google’s YouTube and Twitter to interfere in the 2016 US election, lawmakers have expressed interest in taking tech to task. Since then, the Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission have agreed to split up antitrust enforcement of tech companies between the two agencies, according to various media reports. The DOJ would focus on Apple and Google, which is owned by parent company Alphabet, while the FTC would take on Facebook and Amazon, according to a report in the Journal.The Justice Department’s new probe, announced Tuesday, goes a step beyond those plans, the Journal said. The FTC in February said it formed a task force to monitor competition in the tech sector.”This is the antitrust question of the day,” Fiona Scott Morton, an economics professor at the Yale School of Management, said in an interview.Morton, who testified as an antitrust expert before congress during a hearing with tech companies last week, emphasized the scope of the investigation is still unclear, but she’d be interested in learning more about the general competition behavior of the big tech platforms.Twitter declined to comment. Amazon, Apple and Facebook didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. Google meanwhile referred back to its testimony before Congress last week, during which its director of economic policy, Adam Cohen, said the company has “created new competition in many sectors.” He added, “New competitive pressures often lead to concerns from rivals. We have consistently shown how our business is designed and operated to benefit our customers.”The companies are likely to respond soon, since Facebook, Google parent Alphabet and Amazon are due to report their quarterly earnings to investors this week. Apple is set to report its results next week. TechlashThe backlash against the tech industry has been more bark than bite so far. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill have hauled Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Google CEO Sundar Pichai before various committees to discuss concerns over user privacy, election integrity and censorship.Though the hearings were designed to be big public showdowns between lawmakers and the tech industry, they instead exposed ignorance among government officials about how technology works in the first place. Last year, Sen. Orrin Hatch, the 85-year-old Republican from Utah, asked Zuckerberg, “If [a version of Facebook will always be free], how do you sustain a business model in which users don’t pay for your service?” Zuckerberg paused a moment before saying, “Senator, we run ads.” He, and his staff sitting behind him, then grinned before Hatch moved on to his next question.  Mobile Tech Industry 3 Legal Facebook Apple Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Comments reading • Department of Justice kicks off antitrust review of tech giants Tags Zuckerberg explains the internet to Congress 2:42 Share your voice The high-profile blunder made clear lawmakers were unlikely to act soon (and, in the past year, haven’t passed any meaningful laws to rein in tech). But that hasn’t stopped the DOJ or FTC from pursuing their own investigations, the first fruits of which may be announced this week. The FTC is expected to announce a $5 billion fine against Facebook for failing to adequately protect user data after learning Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy tied to Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, had improperly purchased tens of millions of people’s profile information. Though the FTC considered including language that could potentially hold Zuckerberg personally responsible for future privacy screw-ups, that plan was ultimately abandoned, according to a report by The Washington Post.More comingTech companies know that while they’ve largely avoided scrutiny until now, something is coming. So far, they’ve opted to generally support regulation. Apple CEO Tim Cook and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella have expressed support for stronger privacy rules. Zuckerberg and Dorsey have meanwhile supported the Honest Ads Act, which would require tech companies to disclose who pays for political ads on the internet, much the same way that television and radio stations do now. The tech companies have also stepped up lobbying in Washington, in an effort to help shape whatever may be coming. Facebook topped $4 million in spending in the three months ended June 30, discussing election integrity, privacy, security, advertising and competition, according to a recent government filing. Facebook’s spending was higher than Amazon ($4 million), Google ($2.9 million) and Apple ($1.8 million).The companies have also stepped up their public efforts to push back on any overambitious regulation. That includes a website Apple published in May, after the Supreme Court ruled iPhone owners can sue Apple, accusing its App Store of running a monopoly. Zuckerberg meanwhile has been publishing videos and podcasts of conversations he’s held with academics and other CEOs, discussing censorship and ethics.Whether any of that will help tech with increasing scrutiny it’s now facing is unclear. “We ultimately believe this is more noise vs. the start of broader structural changes across the tech food chain,” Wedbush analyst Daniel Ives wrote in a note to investors shortly after the DOJ’s announcement. “While the further analysis of business models from these tech stalwarts will cause some near-term uncertainty, ultimately we view it as a positive as this potentially could be a catalyst for more technology innovation and diversification down the road for these titans.”CNET’s Shara Tibken and Corinne Reichert contributed to this report.Originally published July 23, 2:08 p.m. PT.Update, 4:12 p.m. PT: Adds details throughout. See All Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier Apple • Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Now playing: Watch this:last_img read more

Fakhrul thanks EC for ensuring justice

first_imgMirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir. File PhotoBNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir on Thursday thanked the election commission for ‘ensuing justice’ as most of their aspirants whose nominations had been declared illegal got back their candidatures through appeals, reports UNB.Taking to reporters at BNP chairperson’s Gulshan office, he also hoped that their chairperson’s nomination will be declared valid if the commission ensures justice to her.“We think the declaration of most of our candidates valid is our victory. We also hope our leader Khaleda Zia will also be declared a legal candidate if justice is ensured,” he said.Fakhrul said the returning officers declared illegal the nominations of many of our candidates but most of them were considered as legal runners through the election commission hearing. “So, I thank the election commission.”He alleged that the returning officers declared illegal most of their candidates’ nominations as they had to obey the government order and they could not ensure justice in many cases for that reason.Replying to a question, Fakhrul said they may announce a partial list of their final candidates for different constituencies after 8pm today.He alleged that the government, being afraid of defeat, is now using state machineries to influence the election.The BNP leader also alleged that law enforcers continued the arrest of their leaders and activists hampering their organisational activities.He urged the government and the election commission to stop arresting opposition activists and create a proper election atmosphere so that all the parties can exercise their democratic rights.last_img read more

DU pharmacy dept refuses to shoulder research that found detergent in milk

first_imgDhaka University’s Department of Pharmacy has distanced itself from a research that found detergent and antibiotics in pasteurised and unpasteurised milk samples.In a media statement on Friday, the department said that it will not take responsibility for the research findings.”The department was not involved with the report and research,” the statement, signed by chairman professor Sitesh Chandra Bachar, read.The Faculty of Pharmacy and Biomedical Research Centre on 25 June said they found traces of detergent and antibiotics in some samples of pasteurised and unpasteurised milk available in the local market.Professor Bachar told UNB that no-one from his department was involved in this research.”It was the job of DU researchers to publish the findings in journals, not to disclose them at a press conference,” he said, suspecting that there might have been “some other intention”.Biomedical Research Centre director professor ABM Faroque also confirmed that the pharmacy department was not involved with the research.He clarified that it was conducted by some members and students of the pharmacy faculty, not the pharmacy department.Prof Faroque defended the findings and making them public.”The research is alright,” he said. “Our only intention was to inform the people after we found the harmful elements in milk.”last_img read more